2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158141
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mexican Immigrant Childbearing Women: Social Support and Perinatal Outcomes
Abstract:
Mexican Immigrant Childbearing Women: Social Support and Perinatal Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Callister, Lynn, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:2525 North 860, East Provo, UT, 84604-4082, USA
Contact Telephone:801-422-3227
Co-Authors:Ana Birkhead
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of less acculturated Mexican immigrant women who had participated in a larger quantitative study about their childbearing experience (Callister, Birkhead, Vega & Crookston, 2004). Background/Significance: Mexicans are the largest immigrant group in the United States, constituting two thirds of the Hispanic population. Mexican women have the highest fertility rate among Hispanic women. In a recent study conducted with 275 Mexican immigrant women giving birth in Utah, first generation and less acculturated women had better perinatal outcomes than more acculturated Mexican immigrant women (Callister, Birkhead, Vega & Crookston, 2004). This study and others demonstrate that first generation and less acculturated Mexican immigrant women have the lowest rates of infant mortality and fewer low birthweight infants despite social risks such as low levels of education, income, and less use of prenatal care (Anachebe & Sutton, 2003). Methods: A convenience sample of 20 less acculturated Mexican immigrant childbearing women participated in audiotaped interviews with bilingual perinatal nurses. Results: This paper reports two pervasive themes in the interviews: the importance of receiving support (recibir de consejo y ayuda) and accepting help from others (acceptar asitencia de otros). Mexican immigrant fathers play a significant role in providing support. Extended female family members and fictive kin had a powerful stress-buffering effect in the lives of these women. Circles of supportive women in the Mexican immigrant community offered emotional, informational, and tangible support. Faith in God was also a strong source of support woven into the lives of Mexican immigrant women. Implications for Practice: Building on the strengths of vulnerable populations, integrating the health beliefs and practices of those who are socially disadvantaged, helping women access personal and professional support networks, and empowering vulnerable women, families, communities, and populations in shared partnerships with health care providers is essential.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMexican Immigrant Childbearing Women: Social Support and Perinatal Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158141-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mexican Immigrant Childbearing Women: Social Support and Perinatal Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Callister, Lynn, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2525 North 860, East Provo, UT, 84604-4082, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-422-3227</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynn_callister@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ana Birkhead</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of less acculturated Mexican immigrant women who had participated in a larger quantitative study about their childbearing experience (Callister, Birkhead, Vega &amp; Crookston, 2004). Background/Significance: Mexicans are the largest immigrant group in the United States, constituting two thirds of the Hispanic population. Mexican women have the highest fertility rate among Hispanic women. In a recent study conducted with 275 Mexican immigrant women giving birth in Utah, first generation and less acculturated women had better perinatal outcomes than more acculturated Mexican immigrant women (Callister, Birkhead, Vega &amp; Crookston, 2004). This study and others demonstrate that first generation and less acculturated Mexican immigrant women have the lowest rates of infant mortality and fewer low birthweight infants despite social risks such as low levels of education, income, and less use of prenatal care (Anachebe &amp; Sutton, 2003). Methods: A convenience sample of 20 less acculturated Mexican immigrant childbearing women participated in audiotaped interviews with bilingual perinatal nurses. Results: This paper reports two pervasive themes in the interviews: the importance of receiving support (recibir de consejo y ayuda) and accepting help from others (acceptar asitencia de otros). Mexican immigrant fathers play a significant role in providing support. Extended female family members and fictive kin had a powerful stress-buffering effect in the lives of these women. Circles of supportive women in the Mexican immigrant community offered emotional, informational, and tangible support. Faith in God was also a strong source of support woven into the lives of Mexican immigrant women. Implications for Practice: Building on the strengths of vulnerable populations, integrating the health beliefs and practices of those who are socially disadvantaged, helping women access personal and professional support networks, and empowering vulnerable women, families, communities, and populations in shared partnerships with health care providers is essential.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:33:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:33:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.