2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158142
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Giving Birth: The Voices of Russian Childbearing Women
Abstract:
Giving Birth: The Voices of Russian Childbearing Women
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Callister, Lynn, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:2525 North 860, East Provo, UT, 84604-4082, USA
Contact Telephone:801-422-3227
Co-Authors:Natalia Getmanenko, Natalia Garvrish
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to determine the meaning of giving birth to Russian women. Rationale/Background: Women give birth within their socio-cultural context, and Russian women are no exception. With a fertility rate of 1.2 children born per woman of childbearing age and a birth rate of 8.8 per 1,000 people, the population in the Russian Federation is declining. Abortion rates are the highest of any country in the world and is the cause of 15% of deaths in women of childbearing age. Recent reductions in the abortion rates and a modest increase in the birth rate is promising. Health care is becoming privatized related to economic changes in the country in this time of transition. Ensuring the health of women and newborns is becoming an increasing priority in the Russian Federation. Methods: Following institutional review board approval and informed consent, a purposive sample of 23 women who had given birth to healthy term infants within the past six months participated in audiotaped interviews conducted at the St. Petersburg Women's Wellness Center in the Russian Federation. Tapes were translated and transcribed and analyzed as appropriate for qualitative inquiry. Following the generation of initial themes, three study participants were contacted to verify preliminary results were reflective of their experiences giving birth. Results: These women represent the new middle class emerging from dramatic socio-political and economic shifts in the former Soviet Union. They made a conscious choice to have a child, even though about 50% had had abortions in the past. They actively sought knowledge, accessing electronic sources which provided advice and shared birth narratives. They prepared to become mothers during their pregnancy by attending childbirth education offerings, called "pregnancy clubs," although because of cultural traditions they did not obtain baby clothes, supplies or furniture until after their babies were born. These women gave birth unmedicated in birth houses with nurse midwife providers with physician consultation. About 50% had the father of their baby present to provide labor support. Many of them gave their children traditional Slavic names and expressed a desire to have another child in the future. Cultural beliefs and practices were identified. These women appreciated the opportunity to articulate their profound feelings about the experience of giving birth and becoming a mother as evidenced in these data bits: "As far as labor, I knew that I was waiting for this moment for nine months. I knew that this [strength] was needed for my baby and that the baby was waiting for me. I knew that we were going towards each other. The hardest time of labor was at the very end when I had no strength to push. I knew I had to hold on." "Giving birth and having a baby completely changed me. I feel like I am a different person. I am calmer, more responsible. I know that I am entrusted with a child and I am responsible for him." Implications: Women give birth within their socio-cultural context. Dramatic socio-political and economic changes are occurring in the Russian Federation, which appear to potentially have a positive impact on the health and well-being of women and newborns. In this millennium of global migration as our world grows increasingly smaller, celebrating cultural differences while embracing global similarities is essential to ensure that culturally sensitive and competent care is provided to women and newborns.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGiving Birth: The Voices of Russian Childbearing Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158142-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Giving Birth: The Voices of Russian Childbearing Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Callister, Lynn, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2525 North 860, East Provo, UT, 84604-4082, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-422-3227</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynn_callister@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Natalia Getmanenko, Natalia Garvrish</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to determine the meaning of giving birth to Russian women. Rationale/Background: Women give birth within their socio-cultural context, and Russian women are no exception. With a fertility rate of 1.2 children born per woman of childbearing age and a birth rate of 8.8 per 1,000 people, the population in the Russian Federation is declining. Abortion rates are the highest of any country in the world and is the cause of 15% of deaths in women of childbearing age. Recent reductions in the abortion rates and a modest increase in the birth rate is promising. Health care is becoming privatized related to economic changes in the country in this time of transition. Ensuring the health of women and newborns is becoming an increasing priority in the Russian Federation. Methods: Following institutional review board approval and informed consent, a purposive sample of 23 women who had given birth to healthy term infants within the past six months participated in audiotaped interviews conducted at the St. Petersburg Women's Wellness Center in the Russian Federation. Tapes were translated and transcribed and analyzed as appropriate for qualitative inquiry. Following the generation of initial themes, three study participants were contacted to verify preliminary results were reflective of their experiences giving birth. Results: These women represent the new middle class emerging from dramatic socio-political and economic shifts in the former Soviet Union. They made a conscious choice to have a child, even though about 50% had had abortions in the past. They actively sought knowledge, accessing electronic sources which provided advice and shared birth narratives. They prepared to become mothers during their pregnancy by attending childbirth education offerings, called &quot;pregnancy clubs,&quot; although because of cultural traditions they did not obtain baby clothes, supplies or furniture until after their babies were born. These women gave birth unmedicated in birth houses with nurse midwife providers with physician consultation. About 50% had the father of their baby present to provide labor support. Many of them gave their children traditional Slavic names and expressed a desire to have another child in the future. Cultural beliefs and practices were identified. These women appreciated the opportunity to articulate their profound feelings about the experience of giving birth and becoming a mother as evidenced in these data bits: &quot;As far as labor, I knew that I was waiting for this moment for nine months. I knew that this [strength] was needed for my baby and that the baby was waiting for me. I knew that we were going towards each other. The hardest time of labor was at the very end when I had no strength to push. I knew I had to hold on.&quot; &quot;Giving birth and having a baby completely changed me. I feel like I am a different person. I am calmer, more responsible. I know that I am entrusted with a child and I am responsible for him.&quot; Implications: Women give birth within their socio-cultural context. Dramatic socio-political and economic changes are occurring in the Russian Federation, which appear to potentially have a positive impact on the health and well-being of women and newborns. In this millennium of global migration as our world grows increasingly smaller, celebrating cultural differences while embracing global similarities is essential to ensure that culturally sensitive and competent care is provided to women and newborns.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:33:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:33:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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