2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158143
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Psychophysiology of Family Processes and Health: Overview
Abstract:
The Psychophysiology of Family Processes and Health: Overview
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Carrere, Sybil, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Research Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Dept of Family & Child Nursing, Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Contact Telephone:206-685-9120
Co-Authors:Cheryl L. Cooke, Younhee Cho, Jeanne Allen
Purpose: This symposium will describe family processes associated with cardiovascular and self-report measures of health in the University of Washington Family Health Project. Rationale: Family interactions play an important role in the health of parents and their children. Marital and family discord can contribute to stress-related cardiovascular arousal in couples and their children. Parenting behaviors that help children with their emotional development influence the physiological stress children experience. In this symposium, the speakers will present a series of data-based papers on the psychophysiological and health results from the first time point of the Family Health Project at the University of Washington. Method: The ongoing longitudinal study is evaluating parenting behaviors that facilitate children's physical and mental health as the children make the transition from middle childhood to adolescence. The study also assesses the family process than influence the health and well-being of the parents. Family and marital biobehavioral interactions are assessed in both the home and the laboratory utilizing self-reports of health and cardiovascular measures of autonomic arousal. Results: The symposium speakers will describe three of the major findings from the first time point of the study. The first speaker will describe the links between parenting efforts to help their children with emotions and their children's cardiovascular arousal during a naturalistic observation session in the home. The second speaker will discuss the association between marital commitment patterns and health. The final speaker will present findings on the association between marital distress, subclinical levels of depression, and cardiovascular measures of stress during family interactions in the home. Implications: The central role of family processes in health outcomes has implications for nursing practice. The results from the Family Health Project highlight the importance of healthcare providers assessing the disruptive, and potentially harmful, health effects of family discord in their patients' lives
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Psychophysiology of Family Processes and Health: Overviewen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158143-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Psychophysiology of Family Processes and Health: Overview</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Carrere, Sybil, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Dept of Family &amp; Child Nursing, Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-685-9120</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carrere@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cheryl L. Cooke, Younhee Cho, Jeanne Allen</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This symposium will describe family processes associated with cardiovascular and self-report measures of health in the University of Washington Family Health Project. Rationale: Family interactions play an important role in the health of parents and their children. Marital and family discord can contribute to stress-related cardiovascular arousal in couples and their children. Parenting behaviors that help children with their emotional development influence the physiological stress children experience. In this symposium, the speakers will present a series of data-based papers on the psychophysiological and health results from the first time point of the Family Health Project at the University of Washington. Method: The ongoing longitudinal study is evaluating parenting behaviors that facilitate children's physical and mental health as the children make the transition from middle childhood to adolescence. The study also assesses the family process than influence the health and well-being of the parents. Family and marital biobehavioral interactions are assessed in both the home and the laboratory utilizing self-reports of health and cardiovascular measures of autonomic arousal. Results: The symposium speakers will describe three of the major findings from the first time point of the study. The first speaker will describe the links between parenting efforts to help their children with emotions and their children's cardiovascular arousal during a naturalistic observation session in the home. The second speaker will discuss the association between marital commitment patterns and health. The final speaker will present findings on the association between marital distress, subclinical levels of depression, and cardiovascular measures of stress during family interactions in the home. Implications: The central role of family processes in health outcomes has implications for nursing practice. The results from the Family Health Project highlight the importance of healthcare providers assessing the disruptive, and potentially harmful, health effects of family discord in their patients' lives</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:33:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:33:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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