Minority Women: Abuse and Risk For Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Bacterial Vaginosis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158144
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Minority Women: Abuse and Risk For Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Bacterial Vaginosis
Abstract:
Minority Women: Abuse and Risk For Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Bacterial Vaginosis
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Champion, Jane, PhD, FNP, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas HSC at San Antonio School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Dept of Family Nursing, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229-3900, USA
Contact Telephone:210-227-7233
Co-Authors:Jeanna M. Piper, Rochelle N. Shain, Jeff E. Korte, Alan E. C. Holden
Purpose: Negative outcomes associated with a history of sexual or physical abuse include a variety of chronic somatic and physical health complaints and disproportionate use of primary health care services. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of sexual or physical abuse to the pathology of genitourinary symptoms that impact on diagnoses of STD, bacterial vaginosis (BV) and risk for PID among minority women with STD. These findings have relevance to clinicians who work with abused women. Rationale/Conceptual Framework: This study was part of a controlled randomized trial of the effects of a sex- and culture-specific behavioral intervention (based on the AIDS Risk Reduction Model and ethnographic data on the study population) on STD recurrence. The principal outcome variable was subsequent chlamydial or gonorrheal infection, evaluated on an intention-to-treat basis by logistic-regression. Mexican- and African-American women (aged 15-45 years) with a current non-viral STD were recruited from public health clinics. Methods: Following enrollment, participants received a targeted physical exam and interview including assessments for sexual, physical or psychological abuse, genitourinary symptomatology, STD, BV and risk for PID. Self-report data assessing risk for PID included age of first coitus, numbers of sex partners, recurrence of STD, and health seeking behaviors. Health care barriers were categorized as financial, logistic, affective and necessity. Results: 862 Mexican- and African-American women were enrolled. Sixty-two percent reported sexual or physical abuse; 74% reported psychological abuse. Abused women reported earlier first coitus, more partners per year sexual activity, more concurrent relationships and higher BV and STD re-infection rates than non-abused. Abused women waited longer to seek medical care, experienced more barriers to health care and more pathological genitourinary symptomatology and abnormal physical exams than nonabused. Clinicians were not more likely to report presumptive current diagnoses of PID for abused than non-abused women. Implications: Findings differentiate abused women at high risk for STD reinfection, BV and PID. Due to its considerable impact on genitourinary symptomatology and risk for PID, abuse assessment is essential in clinical management of minority women with STD, BV and diagnosis of PID.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMinority Women: Abuse and Risk For Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Bacterial Vaginosisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158144-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Minority Women: Abuse and Risk For Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Bacterial Vaginosis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Champion, Jane, PhD, FNP, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas HSC at San Antonio School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Dept of Family Nursing, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229-3900, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">210-227-7233</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dimmitt@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jeanna M. Piper, Rochelle N. Shain, Jeff E. Korte, Alan E. C. Holden</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Negative outcomes associated with a history of sexual or physical abuse include a variety of chronic somatic and physical health complaints and disproportionate use of primary health care services. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of sexual or physical abuse to the pathology of genitourinary symptoms that impact on diagnoses of STD, bacterial vaginosis (BV) and risk for PID among minority women with STD. These findings have relevance to clinicians who work with abused women. Rationale/Conceptual Framework: This study was part of a controlled randomized trial of the effects of a sex- and culture-specific behavioral intervention (based on the AIDS Risk Reduction Model and ethnographic data on the study population) on STD recurrence. The principal outcome variable was subsequent chlamydial or gonorrheal infection, evaluated on an intention-to-treat basis by logistic-regression. Mexican- and African-American women (aged 15-45 years) with a current non-viral STD were recruited from public health clinics. Methods: Following enrollment, participants received a targeted physical exam and interview including assessments for sexual, physical or psychological abuse, genitourinary symptomatology, STD, BV and risk for PID. Self-report data assessing risk for PID included age of first coitus, numbers of sex partners, recurrence of STD, and health seeking behaviors. Health care barriers were categorized as financial, logistic, affective and necessity. Results: 862 Mexican- and African-American women were enrolled. Sixty-two percent reported sexual or physical abuse; 74% reported psychological abuse. Abused women reported earlier first coitus, more partners per year sexual activity, more concurrent relationships and higher BV and STD re-infection rates than non-abused. Abused women waited longer to seek medical care, experienced more barriers to health care and more pathological genitourinary symptomatology and abnormal physical exams than nonabused. Clinicians were not more likely to report presumptive current diagnoses of PID for abused than non-abused women. Implications: Findings differentiate abused women at high risk for STD reinfection, BV and PID. Due to its considerable impact on genitourinary symptomatology and risk for PID, abuse assessment is essential in clinical management of minority women with STD, BV and diagnosis of PID.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:33:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:33:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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