2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158145
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of Leadership on Taiwanese Nursing Faculty Job Satisfaction
Abstract:
The Influence of Leadership on Taiwanese Nursing Faculty Job Satisfaction
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Chen, Hsiu-Chin, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Utah Valley State College
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:303 E 1090 N, Orem, Orem, UT, 84057, USA
Contact Telephone:801-863-6096
Co-Authors:Mark Baron, Larry K. Bright
Background: The rapid change and development in the healthcare system have increased academic and administrative responsibilities for nursing colleges and universities, as well as creating new stress, workload, and challenges on the faculty. Training effective leaders has been proposed as a key to increase professionalism in the nursing field. Yet nursing leaders in Taiwan seldom receive the proper leadership training necessary to lead an academic organization. As a result, the leader may burn out and dissatisfaction among faculty members may increase. Objectives: The main purposes of this study were (1) to describe the leadership styles (transformational, transactional and laissez-faire) of nursing directors as perceived by nursing faculty in Taiwan; (2) to describe the level of nursing faculty job satisfaction in Taiwan; and (3) to identify which leadership styles of nursing directors, as perceived by nursing faculty, relate to nursing faculty job satisfaction levels, while controlling for the organizational characteristics of schools and demographic data of faculty. Methods: This was a descriptive, correlational, and cross-sectional study using self-administered questionnaires. Transformational leadership theory and a direct-effects model supported the research framework. Nine out of 12 schools with nursing programs awarding diplomas to students participated in this study. A roster of faculty members listed on the nine schools' Websites was collected for mailing questionnaires. The procedures of data collection followed the steps of Dillman's (1978) Total Design Method (TDM) for implementing mail surveys. In total, 175 questionnaires were returned representing a 72.0% response rate. Hierarchical multiple regression was employed to determine how well job satisfaction levels were predicted by the leadership style. Results: Taiwanese nursing directors tend to display transformational leadership more frequently than transactional leadership and the laissez-faire in their workplace. Taiwanese nursing faculty reported moderate levels of job satisfaction. Also, Taiwanese nursing directors who were perceived as practicing the transformational leadership of attributed idealized influence more frequently produced higher levels of nursing faculty job satisfaction. However, nursing directors who were perceived as displaying the laissez-faire style more frequently ended up with lower levels of nursing faculty job satisfaction. Implications: The research of leadership styles and job satisfaction in nursing education is fairly new and has not been thoroughly investigated in Taiwan. This study helped pave the path for researchers in Taiwan's nursing field to understand the importance of establishing a leadership training program so that nursing leaders are able to improve their leadership skills. Future studies should engage in examining how transformational leadership drives faculty to a higher level of job satisfaction and motivation necessary for maintaining faculty's productivity and commitment to advance Taiwan's nursing profession.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of Leadership on Taiwanese Nursing Faculty Job Satisfactionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158145-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Influence of Leadership on Taiwanese Nursing Faculty Job Satisfaction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chen, Hsiu-Chin, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Utah Valley State College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">303 E 1090 N, Orem, Orem, UT, 84057, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-863-6096</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chenhs@uvsc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mark Baron, Larry K. Bright</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The rapid change and development in the healthcare system have increased academic and administrative responsibilities for nursing colleges and universities, as well as creating new stress, workload, and challenges on the faculty. Training effective leaders has been proposed as a key to increase professionalism in the nursing field. Yet nursing leaders in Taiwan seldom receive the proper leadership training necessary to lead an academic organization. As a result, the leader may burn out and dissatisfaction among faculty members may increase. Objectives: The main purposes of this study were (1) to describe the leadership styles (transformational, transactional and laissez-faire) of nursing directors as perceived by nursing faculty in Taiwan; (2) to describe the level of nursing faculty job satisfaction in Taiwan; and (3) to identify which leadership styles of nursing directors, as perceived by nursing faculty, relate to nursing faculty job satisfaction levels, while controlling for the organizational characteristics of schools and demographic data of faculty. Methods: This was a descriptive, correlational, and cross-sectional study using self-administered questionnaires. Transformational leadership theory and a direct-effects model supported the research framework. Nine out of 12 schools with nursing programs awarding diplomas to students participated in this study. A roster of faculty members listed on the nine schools' Websites was collected for mailing questionnaires. The procedures of data collection followed the steps of Dillman's (1978) Total Design Method (TDM) for implementing mail surveys. In total, 175 questionnaires were returned representing a 72.0% response rate. Hierarchical multiple regression was employed to determine how well job satisfaction levels were predicted by the leadership style. Results: Taiwanese nursing directors tend to display transformational leadership more frequently than transactional leadership and the laissez-faire in their workplace. Taiwanese nursing faculty reported moderate levels of job satisfaction. Also, Taiwanese nursing directors who were perceived as practicing the transformational leadership of attributed idealized influence more frequently produced higher levels of nursing faculty job satisfaction. However, nursing directors who were perceived as displaying the laissez-faire style more frequently ended up with lower levels of nursing faculty job satisfaction. Implications: The research of leadership styles and job satisfaction in nursing education is fairly new and has not been thoroughly investigated in Taiwan. This study helped pave the path for researchers in Taiwan's nursing field to understand the importance of establishing a leadership training program so that nursing leaders are able to improve their leadership skills. Future studies should engage in examining how transformational leadership drives faculty to a higher level of job satisfaction and motivation necessary for maintaining faculty's productivity and commitment to advance Taiwan's nursing profession.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:33:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:33:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.