2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158146
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender Differences in Symptoms of Acute Coronary Syndromes
Abstract:
Gender Differences in Symptoms of Acute Coronary Syndromes
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Chen, Wanda, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California - San Francisco
Title:Post-Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:40336 Dolerita Avenue, Fremont, CA, 94539, USA
Contact Telephone:206-616-1461
Co-Authors:Susan L. Woods, Kathleen A. Puntillo
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare experiences of symptoms between men and women with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Background: People who delay seeking health care for ACS have less effective and fewer treatment options resulting in higher morbidity and mortality. Many studies have shown that, for unknown reasons, women with ACS delay seeking health care longer than men. One possible explanation is that women do not experience the same symptoms of ACS that are known to occur commonly in men. Despite a growing national interest in, and attention to, gender differences in symptom experiences during ACS, there has been limited information and inconsistent findings in previous studies. Methods: This study was a comparative study with a convenience sample of 112 subjects (66 men, 46 women) having a final diagnosis of ACS at discharge from four hospitals in Seattle. Three self-report instruments were used in the study: (1) background information form; (2) symptom checklist; and (3) modified McGill Pain Questionnaire. Results: After adjusting for cardiac disease (unstable angina vs. acute myocardial infarction), diabetes, and age (65 years old or older vs. under 65 years old) that could affect symptom experiences, women were significantly more likely than men to experience "chest discomfort rather than chest pain" (22% vs. 5%, OR = 5.48, 95% CI = 1.36-22.13), pain or discomfort only in areas of the body other than the chest (17% vs. 6%, OR = 5.20, 95% CI = 1.25-21.54), pain or discomfort that started in the arm(s) first (24% vs. 3%, OR = 11.61, 95% CI = 2.25-59.97), and unexplained anxiety (41% vs. 21%, OR = 2.83, 95% CI = 1.17-6.82). Women were significantly less likely than men to experience chest pain or discomfort (76% vs. 92%, OR = 0.15, 95% CI = 0.04-0.57), pain or discomfort in the left side of the chest (46% vs. 61%, OR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.17-0.93), and chest pain or discomfort as the most worrisome symptom (52% vs. 70%, OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.15-0.88). Although findings were nonsignificant, women were more likely than men to experience shortness of breath (72% vs. 61%), nausea (48% vs. 33%), loss of appetite (41% vs. 21%), and pain or discomfort in the right arm (39% vs. 27%). Women were also nonsignificantly less likely than men to experience pain or discomfort in the central region of the chest (61% vs. 73%) and pain or discomfort only in the chest (11% vs. 23%). Implications: Significant gender differences were observed in several symptoms associated with ACS. This study is the first to identify different pain referral patterns and to compare "chest discomfort rather than chest pain" between men and women. These initial findings require further validation. The implication of this study is that nurses, other health care providers, and the general public need to be especially aware of atypical symptoms in women with ACS in order to diagnose and treat promptly and accurately.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender Differences in Symptoms of Acute Coronary Syndromesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158146-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender Differences in Symptoms of Acute Coronary Syndromes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chen, Wanda, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California - San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post-Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">40336 Dolerita Avenue, Fremont, CA, 94539, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-616-1461</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wchen@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan L. Woods, Kathleen A. Puntillo</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare experiences of symptoms between men and women with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Background: People who delay seeking health care for ACS have less effective and fewer treatment options resulting in higher morbidity and mortality. Many studies have shown that, for unknown reasons, women with ACS delay seeking health care longer than men. One possible explanation is that women do not experience the same symptoms of ACS that are known to occur commonly in men. Despite a growing national interest in, and attention to, gender differences in symptom experiences during ACS, there has been limited information and inconsistent findings in previous studies. Methods: This study was a comparative study with a convenience sample of 112 subjects (66 men, 46 women) having a final diagnosis of ACS at discharge from four hospitals in Seattle. Three self-report instruments were used in the study: (1) background information form; (2) symptom checklist; and (3) modified McGill Pain Questionnaire. Results: After adjusting for cardiac disease (unstable angina vs. acute myocardial infarction), diabetes, and age (65 years old or older vs. under 65 years old) that could affect symptom experiences, women were significantly more likely than men to experience &quot;chest discomfort rather than chest pain&quot; (22% vs. 5%, OR = 5.48, 95% CI = 1.36-22.13), pain or discomfort only in areas of the body other than the chest (17% vs. 6%, OR = 5.20, 95% CI = 1.25-21.54), pain or discomfort that started in the arm(s) first (24% vs. 3%, OR = 11.61, 95% CI = 2.25-59.97), and unexplained anxiety (41% vs. 21%, OR = 2.83, 95% CI = 1.17-6.82). Women were significantly less likely than men to experience chest pain or discomfort (76% vs. 92%, OR = 0.15, 95% CI = 0.04-0.57), pain or discomfort in the left side of the chest (46% vs. 61%, OR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.17-0.93), and chest pain or discomfort as the most worrisome symptom (52% vs. 70%, OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.15-0.88). Although findings were nonsignificant, women were more likely than men to experience shortness of breath (72% vs. 61%), nausea (48% vs. 33%), loss of appetite (41% vs. 21%), and pain or discomfort in the right arm (39% vs. 27%). Women were also nonsignificantly less likely than men to experience pain or discomfort in the central region of the chest (61% vs. 73%) and pain or discomfort only in the chest (11% vs. 23%). Implications: Significant gender differences were observed in several symptoms associated with ACS. This study is the first to identify different pain referral patterns and to compare &quot;chest discomfort rather than chest pain&quot; between men and women. These initial findings require further validation. The implication of this study is that nurses, other health care providers, and the general public need to be especially aware of atypical symptoms in women with ACS in order to diagnose and treat promptly and accurately.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:33:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:33:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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