2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158147
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Related to Use of Acupuncture
Abstract:
Factors Related to Use of Acupuncture
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Chen, Yeou-Lan, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Westminster College
Title:Professor
Contact Address:878 E. 4170 S., Murray, UT, 84107-3082, USA
Contact Telephone:801-832-2161
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore factors relating to the use of acupuncture. Background: The recognition and popularity of acupuncture in the United States bloomed after diplomatic relations with China were normalized in 1971. Currently, most acupuncture research is focused on clinical treatment. Factors that relate and influence people to use acupuncture are not well understood. Methods: A descriptive research design was used with both quantitative and qualitative data collection. A convenience sample of 158 acupuncture users aged 18 and older visiting a busy Utah acupuncture clinic was recruited. A questionnaire was distributed and response rate was 98%. Health belief models were used as theoretical basis for this study. Results: The characteristics of acupuncture users: almost half were 18-49 years old; two thirds were female; almost all had medical insurance, but only one had insurance covering acupuncture expenses; 65% had attended or had graduated from college; 70% described health status as good or very good. A zero to five scale (0 not at all and 5 very much) was used to indicate the level of agreement in each of the following categories: Acupuncture benefits health (M=4.84, SD=1.64); is effective for improving health (M=4.63, SD=1.52); belief in fewer side effects (M=4.34; SD=1.24); have desire to learn (M=4.24; SD=1.21); and have knowledge about (M=2.27; SD=1.56). Motivations for using acupuncture included belief that acupuncture helps (64.7%); western medicine cannot help (57%); friend or family used (49%); friend or family had a positive experience (47.1%); desire to try another way (45.1), liked the manner of acupuncturist (43.1%), controlling ones own health (41.5%); more effective (35.3%); no side effects (23.5%); and curiosity (21.6%). More than half of the participants recently used acupuncture for pain; the remainder cited weight loss, asthma and depression in that order. More than a half reported the decision to use acupuncture was influenced by friend or family, and 1/4 indicated an independent decision. Only 12 (7.8%) reported the decision was influenced by a primary health care provider. Implications: With the popularity of complementary medicine including acupuncture in the US, these findings provide valuable information to health care providers suggesting how to help the public using services other than biomedical conventional medicine.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Related to Use of Acupunctureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158147-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Related to Use of Acupuncture</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chen, Yeou-Lan, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Westminster College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">878 E. 4170 S., Murray, UT, 84107-3082, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-832-2161</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ychen@westminstercollege.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore factors relating to the use of acupuncture. Background: The recognition and popularity of acupuncture in the United States bloomed after diplomatic relations with China were normalized in 1971. Currently, most acupuncture research is focused on clinical treatment. Factors that relate and influence people to use acupuncture are not well understood. Methods: A descriptive research design was used with both quantitative and qualitative data collection. A convenience sample of 158 acupuncture users aged 18 and older visiting a busy Utah acupuncture clinic was recruited. A questionnaire was distributed and response rate was 98%. Health belief models were used as theoretical basis for this study. Results: The characteristics of acupuncture users: almost half were 18-49 years old; two thirds were female; almost all had medical insurance, but only one had insurance covering acupuncture expenses; 65% had attended or had graduated from college; 70% described health status as good or very good. A zero to five scale (0 not at all and 5 very much) was used to indicate the level of agreement in each of the following categories: Acupuncture benefits health (M=4.84, SD=1.64); is effective for improving health (M=4.63, SD=1.52); belief in fewer side effects (M=4.34; SD=1.24); have desire to learn (M=4.24; SD=1.21); and have knowledge about (M=2.27; SD=1.56). Motivations for using acupuncture included belief that acupuncture helps (64.7%); western medicine cannot help (57%); friend or family used (49%); friend or family had a positive experience (47.1%); desire to try another way (45.1), liked the manner of acupuncturist (43.1%), controlling ones own health (41.5%); more effective (35.3%); no side effects (23.5%); and curiosity (21.6%). More than half of the participants recently used acupuncture for pain; the remainder cited weight loss, asthma and depression in that order. More than a half reported the decision to use acupuncture was influenced by friend or family, and 1/4 indicated an independent decision. Only 12 (7.8%) reported the decision was influenced by a primary health care provider. Implications: With the popularity of complementary medicine including acupuncture in the US, these findings provide valuable information to health care providers suggesting how to help the public using services other than biomedical conventional medicine.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:33:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:33:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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