2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158150
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Clusters in Breast Cancer Women During Treatment and Follow Up
Abstract:
Symptom Clusters in Breast Cancer Women During Treatment and Follow Up
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Cho, Maria, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
Title:Assistant Adjunct Professor
Contact Address:2511 Market Street, Oakland, CA, 94607, USA
Contact Telephone:415-476-6975
Co-Authors:Marylin J Dodd, Bruce Cooper, Christine Miaskowski
Purpose/Aims: To examine the pattern of symptom clusters in women with breast cancer over time. Background: The majority of research on symptom management has been directed toward either a single symptom, such as pain or fatigue, or toward their associated symptoms, such as depression or anxiety. Although this approach has advanced the understanding of individual symptom in patients typically present with several concurrent symptoms to clinicians. Since pain, fatigue, depression and sleep disturbance have high prevalence rates in breast cancer patients, it would advance our knowledge by clustering similar patients by their symptom experiences. Methods: Eighty breast cancer women, mean age 49 (SD=9.6), were part of an ongoing randomized clinical trial and completed questionnaires (sleep, fatigue, pain, and depression) at three time points; T1=baseline after first cycle of chemotherapy, T2=completion of course of treatment, and T3=end of study at 4-6months later. The questionnaires used have established reliability and validity. Cluster analysis was used to analyze the symptom data over time. Results: At T1, four-cluster groups emerged. Cluster 1 contained 31 subjects with NO symptoms (mean score on four symptoms is low), Cluster 2 contained a small proportion (n=6) of individuals with moderate severity (mean scores) of two symptoms (pain and fatigue), Cluster 3 contained 32 subjects with moderate severity (mean scores) of two symptoms (fatigue and sleep disturbance), and Cluster 4 contained only 4 patients with high severity (high scores) on ALL symptoms. At T2, four clusters again emerged. Cluster 1 contained 36 subjects with NO symptoms; Cluster 2 (n=16) with high severity on three symptoms (fatigue, depression, and sleep disturbance); Cluster 3 (n=14) with high severity on three symptoms (pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance); Cluster 4 (n=8) with high severity on ALL symptoms. At T3, four clusters groups again emerged. Cluster 1 contained 46 subjects with NO symptoms; Cluster 2 (n=15), with moderate severity on three symptoms (fatigue, depression and sleep disturbance); Cluster 3 (n=7) with moderate severity on three symptoms (pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance); Cluster 4 (n=7) with high on ALL symptoms. Patients did not stay within their cluster groups over time. Number of subjects in NO symptom group increased, however the severity of symptoms in ALL symptom groups significantly increased which effected their quality of life (T1, F3, 68= 8.5 p<0.005; T2, F3, 70= 17.9 p<0.05; T3, F3, 71= 18.3 p<0.05). Implications: The area of symptom clusters is still in its infancy, and distant from realizing the goal of being able to identify/predict similar patients who are at risk for experiencing greater morbidity in the future.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Clusters in Breast Cancer Women During Treatment and Follow Upen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158150-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptom Clusters in Breast Cancer Women During Treatment and Follow Up</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cho, Maria, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Adjunct Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2511 Market Street, Oakland, CA, 94607, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">415-476-6975</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maria.cho@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marylin J Dodd, Bruce Cooper, Christine Miaskowski</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: To examine the pattern of symptom clusters in women with breast cancer over time. Background: The majority of research on symptom management has been directed toward either a single symptom, such as pain or fatigue, or toward their associated symptoms, such as depression or anxiety. Although this approach has advanced the understanding of individual symptom in patients typically present with several concurrent symptoms to clinicians. Since pain, fatigue, depression and sleep disturbance have high prevalence rates in breast cancer patients, it would advance our knowledge by clustering similar patients by their symptom experiences. Methods: Eighty breast cancer women, mean age 49 (SD=9.6), were part of an ongoing randomized clinical trial and completed questionnaires (sleep, fatigue, pain, and depression) at three time points; T1=baseline after first cycle of chemotherapy, T2=completion of course of treatment, and T3=end of study at 4-6months later. The questionnaires used have established reliability and validity. Cluster analysis was used to analyze the symptom data over time. Results: At T1, four-cluster groups emerged. Cluster 1 contained 31 subjects with NO symptoms (mean score on four symptoms is low), Cluster 2 contained a small proportion (n=6) of individuals with moderate severity (mean scores) of two symptoms (pain and fatigue), Cluster 3 contained 32 subjects with moderate severity (mean scores) of two symptoms (fatigue and sleep disturbance), and Cluster 4 contained only 4 patients with high severity (high scores) on ALL symptoms. At T2, four clusters again emerged. Cluster 1 contained 36 subjects with NO symptoms; Cluster 2 (n=16) with high severity on three symptoms (fatigue, depression, and sleep disturbance); Cluster 3 (n=14) with high severity on three symptoms (pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance); Cluster 4 (n=8) with high severity on ALL symptoms. At T3, four clusters groups again emerged. Cluster 1 contained 46 subjects with NO symptoms; Cluster 2 (n=15), with moderate severity on three symptoms (fatigue, depression and sleep disturbance); Cluster 3 (n=7) with moderate severity on three symptoms (pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance); Cluster 4 (n=7) with high on ALL symptoms. Patients did not stay within their cluster groups over time. Number of subjects in NO symptom group increased, however the severity of symptoms in ALL symptom groups significantly increased which effected their quality of life (T1, F3, 68= 8.5 p&lt;0.005; T2, F3, 70= 17.9 p&lt;0.05; T3, F3, 71= 18.3 p&lt;0.05). Implications: The area of symptom clusters is still in its infancy, and distant from realizing the goal of being able to identify/predict similar patients who are at risk for experiencing greater morbidity in the future.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:33:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:33:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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