2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158153
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Traumatic Presentations in Youth Ages 8-17 Exposed to Family Member Homicide
Abstract:
Traumatic Presentations in Youth Ages 8-17 Exposed to Family Member Homicide
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Clements, Paul, PhD, APRN, BC, DF-IAFN
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico College of Nursing
Contact Address:MSC09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:505-272-6061
Background: Homicide is the deliberate and violent extinguishing of one human life by another. The effects of homicide are not limited to the death of the murder victim. Youth who are "left behind," also known as "survivors" or "co-victims," are often significantly affected by intrapsychic trauma. What is not clear is the decision of "when" and "why" youth survivors and their families seek therapeutic intervention. Youth who are victimized by trauma often experience or eventually develop an inability toward mastery and sense of self, or an ability to separate psychologically from the violent physical experiences that produced their trauma. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to use the constructs of the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children [TSCC] to measure traumatic presentations and behaviors in children ages 8 - 17 in the initial 18 months following exposure to the homicide of family member. Sample: A total of 35 study participants were recruited in 2001-2002 throughout the State of New Mexico and the City of Cleveland, Ohio. Consenting participants were interviewed when they presented for bereavement services at a participating study agency. Methods: Post-homicide clinical and interview assessments, including the TSCC, were used to identify specific events and experiences described by participating youth to be disruptive. Findings were analyzed to identify differences in the TSCC post-trauma exposure syndromes of Anxiety, Depression, Post-Traumatic Stress, Dissociation, and Anger, all in relation to the variables of Child Age, Child Gender, Child Race/Ethnicity and Type of Witnessing of the homicide. TSCC T-scores are standardized transformations of raw scale scores with a mean of 50 and a standard deviation of 10. Results: Youth participants presented with T-scores (high 50's) that were not significantly different across participants in subscales of Anxiety, Depression, Post-Traumatic Stress, Dissociation, and Anger in relation to the variables of Child Age, Child Gender, Child race/ethnicity and type of witnessing. Notably, these scores are reflective of the level of self-reported intrapsychic and behavioral disruption (i.e., cognitive, affective/emotional and behavioral domain disruption) measured at the point when the youth were initially brought for bereavement services by the primary caretaker to a participating agency. Conclusions: This study raises several pertinent questions for additional inquiry of current youth-trauma assessment tools regarding identification of unique concerns and symptoms that lead families to believe that there is "something wrong" and that a youth "needs help" after exposure to family member homicide. Although youth participants were not randomized for the study, and self-selected to be interviewed, results suggest the need for development or refinement of appropriate youth trauma assessment tools following family member homicide. New research suggests that the neurobiological effects of trauma are as real as their emotional consequences, that the body appears to "keep score" of traumatic memories, and that it is a theatre where the memory of trauma is reenacted at various time frames.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTraumatic Presentations in Youth Ages 8-17 Exposed to Family Member Homicideen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158153-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Traumatic Presentations in Youth Ages 8-17 Exposed to Family Member Homicide</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clements, Paul, PhD, APRN, BC, DF-IAFN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-272-6061</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pclements@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Homicide is the deliberate and violent extinguishing of one human life by another. The effects of homicide are not limited to the death of the murder victim. Youth who are &quot;left behind,&quot; also known as &quot;survivors&quot; or &quot;co-victims,&quot; are often significantly affected by intrapsychic trauma. What is not clear is the decision of &quot;when&quot; and &quot;why&quot; youth survivors and their families seek therapeutic intervention. Youth who are victimized by trauma often experience or eventually develop an inability toward mastery and sense of self, or an ability to separate psychologically from the violent physical experiences that produced their trauma. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to use the constructs of the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children [TSCC] to measure traumatic presentations and behaviors in children ages 8 - 17 in the initial 18 months following exposure to the homicide of family member. Sample: A total of 35 study participants were recruited in 2001-2002 throughout the State of New Mexico and the City of Cleveland, Ohio. Consenting participants were interviewed when they presented for bereavement services at a participating study agency. Methods: Post-homicide clinical and interview assessments, including the TSCC, were used to identify specific events and experiences described by participating youth to be disruptive. Findings were analyzed to identify differences in the TSCC post-trauma exposure syndromes of Anxiety, Depression, Post-Traumatic Stress, Dissociation, and Anger, all in relation to the variables of Child Age, Child Gender, Child Race/Ethnicity and Type of Witnessing of the homicide. TSCC T-scores are standardized transformations of raw scale scores with a mean of 50 and a standard deviation of 10. Results: Youth participants presented with T-scores (high 50's) that were not significantly different across participants in subscales of Anxiety, Depression, Post-Traumatic Stress, Dissociation, and Anger in relation to the variables of Child Age, Child Gender, Child race/ethnicity and type of witnessing. Notably, these scores are reflective of the level of self-reported intrapsychic and behavioral disruption (i.e., cognitive, affective/emotional and behavioral domain disruption) measured at the point when the youth were initially brought for bereavement services by the primary caretaker to a participating agency. Conclusions: This study raises several pertinent questions for additional inquiry of current youth-trauma assessment tools regarding identification of unique concerns and symptoms that lead families to believe that there is &quot;something wrong&quot; and that a youth &quot;needs help&quot; after exposure to family member homicide. Although youth participants were not randomized for the study, and self-selected to be interviewed, results suggest the need for development or refinement of appropriate youth trauma assessment tools following family member homicide. New research suggests that the neurobiological effects of trauma are as real as their emotional consequences, that the body appears to &quot;keep score&quot; of traumatic memories, and that it is a theatre where the memory of trauma is reenacted at various time frames.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:33:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:33:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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