2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158155
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescent Thoughts When Facing Asthma Self-Management Risk
Abstract:
Adolescent Thoughts When Facing Asthma Self-Management Risk
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Cook, Susanne, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:, 1305 N. Martin, PO Box 872602", Tucson, AZ
Contact Telephone:85287-2602
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this investigation was to assess eight investigator-developed adolescent asthma symptom self-management scenarios for use with the standard gamble technique (SGT). The scenarios were developed and formatted to measure risk preference in a series of gambles among outcomes using the SGT. The specific aim was to identify gaps in the symptom management domains and risk areas described in the scenarios. Specifically the investigation asked: What other adolescent asthma symptom self-management domains and risk areas exist for use with the SGT? Background: Adolescent asthma symptom self-management choices frequently involve uncertain outcomes that include potential dangers such as trigger exposures or delays in treatments that can lead to increased morbidity or mortality. To understand how risk relates to asthma symptom self-management decision-making during adolescence, nurses need valid scenarios to use for testing risk preferences. Methods: During face-to-face interviews adolescents (n=36) were asked two open-ended questions to describe a time when they made an asthma symptom choice related to preventing (prior to onset of symptoms) and treating (after onset of symptoms) asthma symptoms. Questions were asked for each scenario. Responses to open-ended question were recorded. Follow-up questions asked for clarification of responses. No pre-identified expected responses. Data entered into Excel database for content analyses. Sample: Adolescents 13-17/11m (mean15/2m; SD1.7 yr); 20m/16f; 14 Hispanic, 14 Caucasian, 8 Black; asthma severity 5 mild intermittent, 8 mild persistent, 16 moderate, 7 severe; reported daily symptoms w/o meds: 12< 2xweek, 9> 2x wk but not every day, 10 everyday not continuous, and 5 continuous. Results: No new domains or risk areas were clearly identified. However, several themes emerged supporting research about adolescent thoughts when making decisions involving risk (Cook, 2001). Identified were themes that adolescents think about 'what their parents and friends might think or do'; 'what they prefer or think is best for them'; and 'what they knew to be true'. Themes were evidenced by descriptions of actions using 'wait and see' approaches when symptoms are present or anticipated, because they 'prefer' being at social or physical events even when they 'know' certain activities or environments may initiate or exacerbate severe asthma symptoms. A second theme was what 'mom' would want them to do or what 'mom' would do in the situation to treat or prevent their symptoms. The adolescents in this study identified 'mom' as the greatest source of non-medical assistance. Implications: This study supports the reported literature that adolescents face choices involving risk related to preventing asthma symptoms by avoiding exercise triggers; treating asthma by modifying activities with the onset of symptoms; preventing symptoms by avoiding allergy triggers; treating symptoms by seeking non-medical help; preventing symptoms by removing self from triggers; treating asthma symptoms by seeking medical care; treating asthma symptoms by safely using medications; initiating early treatment of asthma symptoms. The scenarios adequately cover the content for measuring risk preferences with the SGT.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescent Thoughts When Facing Asthma Self-Management Risken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158155-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescent Thoughts When Facing Asthma Self-Management Risk</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cook, Susanne, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, 1305 N. Martin, PO Box 872602&quot;, Tucson, AZ</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">85287-2602</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susanne.cook@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this investigation was to assess eight investigator-developed adolescent asthma symptom self-management scenarios for use with the standard gamble technique (SGT). The scenarios were developed and formatted to measure risk preference in a series of gambles among outcomes using the SGT. The specific aim was to identify gaps in the symptom management domains and risk areas described in the scenarios. Specifically the investigation asked: What other adolescent asthma symptom self-management domains and risk areas exist for use with the SGT? Background: Adolescent asthma symptom self-management choices frequently involve uncertain outcomes that include potential dangers such as trigger exposures or delays in treatments that can lead to increased morbidity or mortality. To understand how risk relates to asthma symptom self-management decision-making during adolescence, nurses need valid scenarios to use for testing risk preferences. Methods: During face-to-face interviews adolescents (n=36) were asked two open-ended questions to describe a time when they made an asthma symptom choice related to preventing (prior to onset of symptoms) and treating (after onset of symptoms) asthma symptoms. Questions were asked for each scenario. Responses to open-ended question were recorded. Follow-up questions asked for clarification of responses. No pre-identified expected responses. Data entered into Excel database for content analyses. Sample: Adolescents 13-17/11m (mean15/2m; SD1.7 yr); 20m/16f; 14 Hispanic, 14 Caucasian, 8 Black; asthma severity 5 mild intermittent, 8 mild persistent, 16 moderate, 7 severe; reported daily symptoms w/o meds: 12&lt; 2xweek, 9&gt; 2x wk but not every day, 10 everyday not continuous, and 5 continuous. Results: No new domains or risk areas were clearly identified. However, several themes emerged supporting research about adolescent thoughts when making decisions involving risk (Cook, 2001). Identified were themes that adolescents think about 'what their parents and friends might think or do'; 'what they prefer or think is best for them'; and 'what they knew to be true'. Themes were evidenced by descriptions of actions using 'wait and see' approaches when symptoms are present or anticipated, because they 'prefer' being at social or physical events even when they 'know' certain activities or environments may initiate or exacerbate severe asthma symptoms. A second theme was what 'mom' would want them to do or what 'mom' would do in the situation to treat or prevent their symptoms. The adolescents in this study identified 'mom' as the greatest source of non-medical assistance. Implications: This study supports the reported literature that adolescents face choices involving risk related to preventing asthma symptoms by avoiding exercise triggers; treating asthma by modifying activities with the onset of symptoms; preventing symptoms by avoiding allergy triggers; treating symptoms by seeking non-medical help; preventing symptoms by removing self from triggers; treating asthma symptoms by seeking medical care; treating asthma symptoms by safely using medications; initiating early treatment of asthma symptoms. The scenarios adequately cover the content for measuring risk preferences with the SGT.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:33:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:33:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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