2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158156
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Meaning for Elders of Receiving Family Care
Abstract:
The Meaning for Elders of Receiving Family Care
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Crist, Janice, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Aims: The purpose of the qualitative study was to broaden nurse clinicians', policy-makers', and researchers' understanding of what it means to elders to receive family care. Background: The number of older people receiving assistance at home will increase tremendously in coming decades in proportion to the rapidly increasing aged population. Seventy to 80% of the care received by elders is provided by family members. As more elders with fewer family carers are predicted, nursing's insight into the family care phenomenon becomes even more important. The literature contained reports of specific aspects of family care. Most results included reports of elders' dreading giving up their independence within the context of Euro-American United States society's highly valued cultural norm of fierce independence. No studies had elicited elders' voices about the meaning of receiving family care. Methods: Hermeneutic interpretive phenomenology was chosen as the most appropriate methodology for understanding elders' meanings of receiving family care. The sample of nine elders contained five women and four men. Elders were asked for descriptions of their day-to-day experiences of receiving family care in two to five interviews, and were observed interacting with their family carers in naturalistic settings. The sample was mainly Anglo. Findings: Elders living at home were found to incorporate help from family members comfortably into their lives. Elders viewed themselves as autonomous and able to maintain balance between autonomy and dependence on loved ones. Applications: Receiving family care may have positive meaning for elders, especially when the care is provided within the context of positive relationships with family carers. These findings, which are in contrast to extant knowledge about individualistic Euro-American cultural norms for autonomy in the literature, may inform practice and policy in health care systems involved in collaborating with families in developing care arrangements for community-living elders. The research was conducted with a primarily Anglo sample. Subsequent studies in the investigator's program of research has suggested that Latino elders may have similar views of receiving family care, although collectivistic cultural norms may differ. Findings of the combined studies provide opportunities for culturally competent nursing care and further research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Meaning for Elders of Receiving Family Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158156-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Meaning for Elders of Receiving Family Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Crist, Janice, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jcrist@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aims: The purpose of the qualitative study was to broaden nurse clinicians', policy-makers', and researchers' understanding of what it means to elders to receive family care. Background: The number of older people receiving assistance at home will increase tremendously in coming decades in proportion to the rapidly increasing aged population. Seventy to 80% of the care received by elders is provided by family members. As more elders with fewer family carers are predicted, nursing's insight into the family care phenomenon becomes even more important. The literature contained reports of specific aspects of family care. Most results included reports of elders' dreading giving up their independence within the context of Euro-American United States society's highly valued cultural norm of fierce independence. No studies had elicited elders' voices about the meaning of receiving family care. Methods: Hermeneutic interpretive phenomenology was chosen as the most appropriate methodology for understanding elders' meanings of receiving family care. The sample of nine elders contained five women and four men. Elders were asked for descriptions of their day-to-day experiences of receiving family care in two to five interviews, and were observed interacting with their family carers in naturalistic settings. The sample was mainly Anglo. Findings: Elders living at home were found to incorporate help from family members comfortably into their lives. Elders viewed themselves as autonomous and able to maintain balance between autonomy and dependence on loved ones. Applications: Receiving family care may have positive meaning for elders, especially when the care is provided within the context of positive relationships with family carers. These findings, which are in contrast to extant knowledge about individualistic Euro-American cultural norms for autonomy in the literature, may inform practice and policy in health care systems involved in collaborating with families in developing care arrangements for community-living elders. The research was conducted with a primarily Anglo sample. Subsequent studies in the investigator's program of research has suggested that Latino elders may have similar views of receiving family care, although collectivistic cultural norms may differ. Findings of the combined studies provide opportunities for culturally competent nursing care and further research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:33:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:33:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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