2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158158
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sleep Inadequacy and Environmental Demands Among Racially Diverse Women
Abstract:
Sleep Inadequacy and Environmental Demands Among Racially Diverse Women
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Dailey, Dawn, RN, MSN, PhD(c)
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Co-Authors:Harvey C. Davis, Bruce A. Cooper, Kathryn A. Lee
Aim: To describe environmental demands associated with sleep inadequacy among Caucasian and African American women. Background: Sleep disturbance is purported to affect an individual's health through physiological, cognitive, emotional and social mechanisms. Regardless of age, women are more likely to suffer from poor sleep. However, little is known about sleep inadequacy in subgroups of American women. Conceptual Basis: This study is based on an adaptation of a framework developed by Lee and colleagues (1994) that describes internal and external environmental demands resulting in sleep disturbance and fatigue. Internal environmental demands are characterized as physical illness, depression, age, dietary patterns, weight, menstrual cycle, self-esteem, smoking patterns, alcohol use, physical activity, mental health, stress, and energy levels. External environmental demands are characterized as marital status, income, employment status, educational level, number and age of children, role demands, and life events. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted using the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) database. BRFSS is an ongoing data collection program designed to measure behavioral risk factors in random samples of adults 18 years and older. Of the 62,341 individuals surveyed, 29,465 were Caucasian women and 3,040 were African American women. Ages ranged from 18 to 65 years (mean = 42 years). Participants were asked to report the number of days they did not get enough sleep within the last month. Days of inadequate sleep in the past month were re-coded as mild (0-11 days), moderate (12-23 days), or severe (24-30 days). Comparative analyses (t-test, chi square) were used to describe differences in health-related characteristics and sleep adequacy between the two groups of women. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify key factors related to insufficient sleep. Results: While approximately the same percentage of Caucasian (33%) and African American (34%) women reported overall sleep inadequacy (moderate and severe), significantly more African American women (22%) compared to Caucasian women (16%) reported severe problems with sleep (X2=61.02; p=.001). Preliminary findings indicate that sleep inadequacy is associated with specific health behaviors, chronic medical conditions and psychological symptoms. Implications: Preliminary results indicate that perception of inadequate sleep permeates the lives of women. Findings suggest that African American women suffer from more severe sleep problems than their Caucasian counterparts. Inadequate sleep has a profound impact on health, functioning and well-being. These findings support existing knowledge of sleep disturbances and suggest the further development of effective interventions to enhance sleep quality in African American women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSleep Inadequacy and Environmental Demands Among Racially Diverse Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158158-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sleep Inadequacy and Environmental Demands Among Racially Diverse Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dailey, Dawn, RN, MSN, PhD(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dedailey@sbcglobal.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Harvey C. Davis, Bruce A. Cooper, Kathryn A. Lee</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: To describe environmental demands associated with sleep inadequacy among Caucasian and African American women. Background: Sleep disturbance is purported to affect an individual's health through physiological, cognitive, emotional and social mechanisms. Regardless of age, women are more likely to suffer from poor sleep. However, little is known about sleep inadequacy in subgroups of American women. Conceptual Basis: This study is based on an adaptation of a framework developed by Lee and colleagues (1994) that describes internal and external environmental demands resulting in sleep disturbance and fatigue. Internal environmental demands are characterized as physical illness, depression, age, dietary patterns, weight, menstrual cycle, self-esteem, smoking patterns, alcohol use, physical activity, mental health, stress, and energy levels. External environmental demands are characterized as marital status, income, employment status, educational level, number and age of children, role demands, and life events. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted using the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) database. BRFSS is an ongoing data collection program designed to measure behavioral risk factors in random samples of adults 18 years and older. Of the 62,341 individuals surveyed, 29,465 were Caucasian women and 3,040 were African American women. Ages ranged from 18 to 65 years (mean = 42 years). Participants were asked to report the number of days they did not get enough sleep within the last month. Days of inadequate sleep in the past month were re-coded as mild (0-11 days), moderate (12-23 days), or severe (24-30 days). Comparative analyses (t-test, chi square) were used to describe differences in health-related characteristics and sleep adequacy between the two groups of women. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify key factors related to insufficient sleep. Results: While approximately the same percentage of Caucasian (33%) and African American (34%) women reported overall sleep inadequacy (moderate and severe), significantly more African American women (22%) compared to Caucasian women (16%) reported severe problems with sleep (X2=61.02; p=.001). Preliminary findings indicate that sleep inadequacy is associated with specific health behaviors, chronic medical conditions and psychological symptoms. Implications: Preliminary results indicate that perception of inadequate sleep permeates the lives of women. Findings suggest that African American women suffer from more severe sleep problems than their Caucasian counterparts. Inadequate sleep has a profound impact on health, functioning and well-being. These findings support existing knowledge of sleep disturbances and suggest the further development of effective interventions to enhance sleep quality in African American women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:34:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:34:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.