2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158159
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparative Study of Spirituality in Home Hospice Patients
Abstract:
A Comparative Study of Spirituality in Home Hospice Patients
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Dobratz, Marjorie, RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Professor and Program Director
Purpose: Spirituality is related to psychological well-being, quality of life, and decreased death distress in terminal illness; however, few quantitative studies examine this vital component of end-of-life care. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to compare two groups of home hospice patients for variables of psychological well-being, psychological adaptation, social support, physical function, pain, and selected demographics as they impacted expressed spirituality. Background: A previous qualitative study found 44 participants (45.4%) who referenced content related to spirituality (Expressed Spirituality). This same study also identified 53 individuals (54.6%), from a total sample of 97, who did not disclose any content related to personal notions of spirituality (Non-Expressed Spirituality). The present study was a secondary analysis that compared the Expressed Spirituality (Group I) and Non-Expressed Spirituality (Group II) groups. Methods: The design was an independent samples t test. The mean age for Group I was 66.1 years and there were 27 males and 17 females, with 38 Caucasian, 4 Mexican-American, and 2 African-Americans. The diagnoses for Group I were 35 cancer, 4 HIV/AIDS, 2 ALS, and 3 end-stage cardiac, with 26 Protestant, 12 Catholic, I Jewish and 5 other religious affiliations. The mean age for Group II was 65 years and there were 33 males and 20 females with 49 Caucasian, 1 Mexican-American, 1 Asian, and two unlisted. The diagnoses for Group II were 41 cancer, 6 HIV/AIDS, 4 ALS, and 2 other, with 30 Protestant, 12 Catholic, 1 Jewish, and 10 other. Human subjects approval from the sponsoring university was secured for the secondary analysis, as well as the original study. Variables were measured by the Life Closure Scale (Dobratz, 1990, 2004); the Affect Balance Scale (Bradburn, 1969); the PRQ-85 (Brand & Weinert, 1981; Weinert, 1987); the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (Karnofsy et al., 1948); and the McGill-Melzack Pain Questionnaire (Melzack, 1975). Results: An independent samples t-test for Group I (n=44) and Group II (n=53) showed no significant differences at p <0.05 for demographics of age, gender, education, living situation, and length of illness, as well as variables of psychological well-being, psychological adaptation, social support, and physical function. Three components of the McGill-Melzack Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) were significant for Group II: the Affective Dimension (t 2.72, df = 92.93, p < .008, two-tailed); Total Pain Score (t 2.32, df = 91.14, p < .022, two-tailed); and Number of Words Chosen (t 2.25, df = 90.53, p < .027, two-tailed). Implications: A comparative analysis of two groups of home hospice patients substantiated pain as an indicator of expressed spirituality. With pain a total experience that impacts affective, as well as sensory dimensions, the importance of end-of-life assessment is supported. As spirituality was not measured in this study, group comparisons are limited. Nonetheless, findings indicate the need for further research that explores the effect of existential or spiritual distress on pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparative Study of Spirituality in Home Hospice Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158159-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Comparative Study of Spirituality in Home Hospice Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dobratz, Marjorie, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Program Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mdobratz@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Spirituality is related to psychological well-being, quality of life, and decreased death distress in terminal illness; however, few quantitative studies examine this vital component of end-of-life care. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to compare two groups of home hospice patients for variables of psychological well-being, psychological adaptation, social support, physical function, pain, and selected demographics as they impacted expressed spirituality. Background: A previous qualitative study found 44 participants (45.4%) who referenced content related to spirituality (Expressed Spirituality). This same study also identified 53 individuals (54.6%), from a total sample of 97, who did not disclose any content related to personal notions of spirituality (Non-Expressed Spirituality). The present study was a secondary analysis that compared the Expressed Spirituality (Group I) and Non-Expressed Spirituality (Group II) groups. Methods: The design was an independent samples t test. The mean age for Group I was 66.1 years and there were 27 males and 17 females, with 38 Caucasian, 4 Mexican-American, and 2 African-Americans. The diagnoses for Group I were 35 cancer, 4 HIV/AIDS, 2 ALS, and 3 end-stage cardiac, with 26 Protestant, 12 Catholic, I Jewish and 5 other religious affiliations. The mean age for Group II was 65 years and there were 33 males and 20 females with 49 Caucasian, 1 Mexican-American, 1 Asian, and two unlisted. The diagnoses for Group II were 41 cancer, 6 HIV/AIDS, 4 ALS, and 2 other, with 30 Protestant, 12 Catholic, 1 Jewish, and 10 other. Human subjects approval from the sponsoring university was secured for the secondary analysis, as well as the original study. Variables were measured by the Life Closure Scale (Dobratz, 1990, 2004); the Affect Balance Scale (Bradburn, 1969); the PRQ-85 (Brand &amp; Weinert, 1981; Weinert, 1987); the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (Karnofsy et al., 1948); and the McGill-Melzack Pain Questionnaire (Melzack, 1975). Results: An independent samples t-test for Group I (n=44) and Group II (n=53) showed no significant differences at p &lt;0.05 for demographics of age, gender, education, living situation, and length of illness, as well as variables of psychological well-being, psychological adaptation, social support, and physical function. Three components of the McGill-Melzack Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) were significant for Group II: the Affective Dimension (t 2.72, df = 92.93, p &lt; .008, two-tailed); Total Pain Score (t 2.32, df = 91.14, p &lt; .022, two-tailed); and Number of Words Chosen (t 2.25, df = 90.53, p &lt; .027, two-tailed). Implications: A comparative analysis of two groups of home hospice patients substantiated pain as an indicator of expressed spirituality. With pain a total experience that impacts affective, as well as sensory dimensions, the importance of end-of-life assessment is supported. As spirituality was not measured in this study, group comparisons are limited. Nonetheless, findings indicate the need for further research that explores the effect of existential or spiritual distress on pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:34:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:34:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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