The Psychophysiology of Family Processes and Health: Health and Relational Commitment Among Married Couples

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158161
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Psychophysiology of Family Processes and Health: Health and Relational Commitment Among Married Couples
Abstract:
The Psychophysiology of Family Processes and Health: Health and Relational Commitment Among Married Couples
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Doohan, Eve-Anne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of of San Francisco, Dept. of Communication Studies
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Sybil CarrFre, Stephanie Jones
Purpose: This research looks at the relationships between married couples' self-ratings of their overall health and self-reports of relational commitment. Rationale: Relational commitment is an important variable in marital research that helps to explain why some satisfying relationships end, while dissatisfying relationships continue. While research has examined connections between health and marital satisfaction, it has not looked explicitly at the possible connections between health and relational commitment. This study seeks to address this issue. Method: Married couples involved in a longitudinal study on family communication patterns completed questionnaire measures designed to assess these variables. Health was assessed by asking spouses to rate their overall health on a scale of 0 (very poor) to 100 (very good). Commitment, which is generally defined as the psychological intention to remain in a relationship, was assessed using the Dimensions of Commitment Inventory (DCI; Adams & Jones, 1997) and the Commitment Inventory (CI; Stanley & Markman, 1992). The DCI includes measures of three dimensions of commitment, including commitment to spouse, commitment to marriage, and feelings of entrapment. The CI includes measures of primacy of relationship and alternative monitoring. Results: The results indicate that the relationship between commitment and health is different for husbands and wives. Husbands' health was correlated with their own commitment to their spouse (.263) and primacy of relationship (.297); however, it was not correlated with the commitment levels of their wives. Wives' health was correlated with both their husbands' and their own primacy of relationship (.277 and .214, respectively). Wives' health was also positively correlated with their husbands' alternative monitoring (.200) and commitment to spouse (.316). Implications: These results indicate that higher levels of marital commitment are related to greater health. These findings further suggest that wives' health is related more to their husbands' commitment than their own, whereas husbands' health is not influenced by their wives' commitment. Additional research should be conducted to further explore the specific links between overall health and marital outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Psychophysiology of Family Processes and Health: Health and Relational Commitment Among Married Couplesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158161-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Psychophysiology of Family Processes and Health: Health and Relational Commitment Among Married Couples</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Doohan, Eve-Anne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of of San Francisco, Dept. of Communication Studies</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">edoohan@usfca.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sybil CarrFre, Stephanie Jones</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This research looks at the relationships between married couples' self-ratings of their overall health and self-reports of relational commitment. Rationale: Relational commitment is an important variable in marital research that helps to explain why some satisfying relationships end, while dissatisfying relationships continue. While research has examined connections between health and marital satisfaction, it has not looked explicitly at the possible connections between health and relational commitment. This study seeks to address this issue. Method: Married couples involved in a longitudinal study on family communication patterns completed questionnaire measures designed to assess these variables. Health was assessed by asking spouses to rate their overall health on a scale of 0 (very poor) to 100 (very good). Commitment, which is generally defined as the psychological intention to remain in a relationship, was assessed using the Dimensions of Commitment Inventory (DCI; Adams &amp; Jones, 1997) and the Commitment Inventory (CI; Stanley &amp; Markman, 1992). The DCI includes measures of three dimensions of commitment, including commitment to spouse, commitment to marriage, and feelings of entrapment. The CI includes measures of primacy of relationship and alternative monitoring. Results: The results indicate that the relationship between commitment and health is different for husbands and wives. Husbands' health was correlated with their own commitment to their spouse (.263) and primacy of relationship (.297); however, it was not correlated with the commitment levels of their wives. Wives' health was correlated with both their husbands' and their own primacy of relationship (.277 and .214, respectively). Wives' health was also positively correlated with their husbands' alternative monitoring (.200) and commitment to spouse (.316). Implications: These results indicate that higher levels of marital commitment are related to greater health. These findings further suggest that wives' health is related more to their husbands' commitment than their own, whereas husbands' health is not influenced by their wives' commitment. Additional research should be conducted to further explore the specific links between overall health and marital outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:34:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:34:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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