2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158163
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Quality of Life in Older Mexican American Women
Abstract:
Predictors of Quality of Life in Older Mexican American Women
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Dunn, Mary, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas HSC at San Antonio School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor and Chair
Co-Authors:Pamela Hodges, Della Wagner
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive power of depression and symptoms of chronic illness in relation to physical function as an aspect of quality of life among older Mexican American women. Background: Chronic illnesses extort a particularly heavy health and economic burden on older adults. Frequently chronic medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension and diabetes are associated with depressive symptoms. Illness symptoms diminish quality of life, may cause premature institutionalization, and greatly increase health care costs. The older Mexican American population represents 12.5 percent of the U.S. population, or about thirty-five million individuals. The U. S. Census Bureau projects that; by the year 2035, there will be seventy-five million Hispanic individuals comprising twenty percent of the population. Since older Mexican American women are considered a vulnerable population, it is important to address health disparities that disproportionately affect these individuals. Methods: A descriptive-correlational study used measures of depression, physical and mental function, as well as social, cultural, and economic factors. The convenience sample of ninety Mexican American women age 65-97 years living in a large Southwestern city was recruited from community settings via referrals or following group presentations. Informed consent, safety health screening and MD approval (if necessary) were obtained prior to data collection. Individual and group interviews were used to subjectively and objectively assess cognition, depression, social and financial resources, and physical health and function. Instruments included the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (physical health), the Geriatric Depression Scale (mental health), the Executive Interview (cognition), the Veterans Specific Activity Questionnaire (self-perceived physical capacity), and the Three-Minute walk (physical function), among others. Outcomes: The sample profile was widowed obese Mexican American women with middle school education and lower income. Nine out of 10 reported non-severe symptoms associated with chronic illness, and only one-third said the symptoms interfered with daily life. Fewer symptoms and greater perceived physical function were related to more acculturation. Symptoms accounted for sixty percent of the variance in depression scores. The relationship between depression and physical function was mediated by cognition. Conclusions: Depression and chronic illness are linked to quality of life among older Mexican American women inevitably placing increasing demands on their families and on the public health system. The health and quality of life of older Americans is an important nursing research priority. Much remains to be learned about measures to prevent or delay the onset of chronic illnesses in order to improve quality of life and prevent disability in this vulnerable population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Quality of Life in Older Mexican American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158163-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Quality of Life in Older Mexican American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dunn, Mary, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas HSC at San Antonio School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Chair</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dunnm@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Pamela Hodges, Della Wagner</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive power of depression and symptoms of chronic illness in relation to physical function as an aspect of quality of life among older Mexican American women. Background: Chronic illnesses extort a particularly heavy health and economic burden on older adults. Frequently chronic medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension and diabetes are associated with depressive symptoms. Illness symptoms diminish quality of life, may cause premature institutionalization, and greatly increase health care costs. The older Mexican American population represents 12.5 percent of the U.S. population, or about thirty-five million individuals. The U. S. Census Bureau projects that; by the year 2035, there will be seventy-five million Hispanic individuals comprising twenty percent of the population. Since older Mexican American women are considered a vulnerable population, it is important to address health disparities that disproportionately affect these individuals. Methods: A descriptive-correlational study used measures of depression, physical and mental function, as well as social, cultural, and economic factors. The convenience sample of ninety Mexican American women age 65-97 years living in a large Southwestern city was recruited from community settings via referrals or following group presentations. Informed consent, safety health screening and MD approval (if necessary) were obtained prior to data collection. Individual and group interviews were used to subjectively and objectively assess cognition, depression, social and financial resources, and physical health and function. Instruments included the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (physical health), the Geriatric Depression Scale (mental health), the Executive Interview (cognition), the Veterans Specific Activity Questionnaire (self-perceived physical capacity), and the Three-Minute walk (physical function), among others. Outcomes: The sample profile was widowed obese Mexican American women with middle school education and lower income. Nine out of 10 reported non-severe symptoms associated with chronic illness, and only one-third said the symptoms interfered with daily life. Fewer symptoms and greater perceived physical function were related to more acculturation. Symptoms accounted for sixty percent of the variance in depression scores. The relationship between depression and physical function was mediated by cognition. Conclusions: Depression and chronic illness are linked to quality of life among older Mexican American women inevitably placing increasing demands on their families and on the public health system. The health and quality of life of older Americans is an important nursing research priority. Much remains to be learned about measures to prevent or delay the onset of chronic illnesses in order to improve quality of life and prevent disability in this vulnerable population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:34:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:34:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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