The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Database Utilization by Public Health Nurses in Montana

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158168
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Database Utilization by Public Health Nurses in Montana
Abstract:
The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Database Utilization by Public Health Nurses in Montana
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Fee, Sharon
P.I. Institution Name:UCHSC School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Wade Hill
Problem: The successful establishment of an environmental public health tracking (EPHT) system in Montana requires active participation of public health workers and the development of pilot tracking systems that allow existing environmental exposure data to be linked with existing health outcome data. Understanding how public health nurses in Montana use existing public health and environmental databases and their perceptions of ease of access will allow EPHT planning to appropriately target both pilot linking projects and education and support for the public health workforce. Description of Project: Survey methods were employed to determine database utilization and perceptions of ease of access to available databases among public health nurses in Montana. A tailored instrument was developed based on input from public health nurses, the Montana Environmental Public Health Tracking Advisory Committee, and discussions with other states engaged in parallel efforts. A multi-mode (web-based & paper/pencil) survey was delivered according to the Dillman Method and resulted in a 76% response rate (n = 163). Findings: Among public health nurses in Montana, the most often cited databases used include the Montana Fetal, Infant, and Child Mortality Database (64% use) and Vital Statistics for both Birth and Death (58% use). Among nurses using these databases, 79% stated that they were "easy to access". The least used sources of data among this sample with less than 5% of the respondents indicating use include the Scorecard.org website (Environmental Defense), the Toxic Release Inventory (US EPA), and the PCS database for water discharge permits (US EPA). Other sources of data with environmental information such as the Superfund Information Systems, Safe Drinking Water Information System, and the AIRS Database (air pollutants in Montana) were used by less than 10% of the sample. Implications: Public health nurses in Montana appear to be relatively familiar with databases that focus on health outcomes such as Vital Statistics for Birth and Death. For these data systems, satisfaction with ease of access appears positive. However, data systems that contain information about exposures to toxic contaminants in air or water within Montana are rarely used by public health nurses. This finding supports the idea that public health nurses have difficulty incorporating environmental issues into their practice and suggests that educational efforts be directed towards expanding awareness and self-efficacy within this population for environmental health nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Database Utilization by Public Health Nurses in Montanaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158168-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Database Utilization by Public Health Nurses in Montana</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fee, Sharon</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UCHSC School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sharon.connor@uchsc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Wade Hill</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: The successful establishment of an environmental public health tracking (EPHT) system in Montana requires active participation of public health workers and the development of pilot tracking systems that allow existing environmental exposure data to be linked with existing health outcome data. Understanding how public health nurses in Montana use existing public health and environmental databases and their perceptions of ease of access will allow EPHT planning to appropriately target both pilot linking projects and education and support for the public health workforce. Description of Project: Survey methods were employed to determine database utilization and perceptions of ease of access to available databases among public health nurses in Montana. A tailored instrument was developed based on input from public health nurses, the Montana Environmental Public Health Tracking Advisory Committee, and discussions with other states engaged in parallel efforts. A multi-mode (web-based &amp; paper/pencil) survey was delivered according to the Dillman Method and resulted in a 76% response rate (n = 163). Findings: Among public health nurses in Montana, the most often cited databases used include the Montana Fetal, Infant, and Child Mortality Database (64% use) and Vital Statistics for both Birth and Death (58% use). Among nurses using these databases, 79% stated that they were &quot;easy to access&quot;. The least used sources of data among this sample with less than 5% of the respondents indicating use include the Scorecard.org website (Environmental Defense), the Toxic Release Inventory (US EPA), and the PCS database for water discharge permits (US EPA). Other sources of data with environmental information such as the Superfund Information Systems, Safe Drinking Water Information System, and the AIRS Database (air pollutants in Montana) were used by less than 10% of the sample. Implications: Public health nurses in Montana appear to be relatively familiar with databases that focus on health outcomes such as Vital Statistics for Birth and Death. For these data systems, satisfaction with ease of access appears positive. However, data systems that contain information about exposures to toxic contaminants in air or water within Montana are rarely used by public health nurses. This finding supports the idea that public health nurses have difficulty incorporating environmental issues into their practice and suggests that educational efforts be directed towards expanding awareness and self-efficacy within this population for environmental health nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:34:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:34:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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