2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158169
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physical Examination Techniques: Does Education Make a Difference?
Abstract:
Physical Examination Techniques: Does Education Make a Difference?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Giddens, Jean, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico
Title:Associate Professor
Purpose/Aims: Physical assessment is traditionally taught in greater depth in baccalaureate nursing programs compared to associate degree programs. However, many of the techniques taught are not routinely performed by nurses in clinical practice. The purpose of this cross-sectional exploratory research was to determine if differences exist in the frequency of physical assessment techniques performed by associate- and baccalaureate-prepared nurses. Rationale/Background: Rapid changes in health care have underscored the need for reform in health science education; nursing education is no exception. One of many problems cited is overcrowded curricula; thus an evaluation of content is necessary. Nurse educators must become more selective about content within nursing curricula. Methods: The sample for this study (N=96) was a subset of 193 randomly surveyed registered nurses employed in direct patient care roles (in both inpatient and outpatient settings) at a large university-based heath care facility in the Southwest who worked at least 20 hours a week. Data were collected using a 124-item survey of physical examination techniques; participants indicated the average frequency they performed the techniques. Each participant was contacted by the researcher and provided with a written and verbal explanation of the study along with assurances that participation was voluntary and that their responses would remain confidential. Individuals agreeing to participate completed the survey and were given a $5 gift certificate as compensation for their time and the information they provided. The survey contained no personal identifiers and was directly administered and collected by the researcher, preventing other individuals (such as nurse managers) from seeing individually completed forms. From the larger sample, 48 participants with a bachelor of science degree in nursing (BSN) were matched with 48 participants with an associate degree in nursing (ADN) by clinical area and years of experience to control for differences between the two groups. Results: The majority of the 96 participants was employed full time (81.4%) and worked in an inpatient hospital setting (90.4 %). The sample represented the following practice categories: adult, pediatric, perioperative, and maternal-infant. The number of years in clinical practice ranged from 0 to 24, with a mean of 10.8 (SD = 6.72) years. A Mann-Whitney test showed no differences in frequency of assessment categories performed by nurses representing these two groups. A small negative correlation was found between frequency and years of experience with the nutrition assessment category (rho = -.298, p = .003). These findings suggest that in-depth physical examination content taught in many baccalaureate nursing programs does not result in a difference in the examination techniques performed in practice by baccalaureate-prepared nurses compared with associate-prepared nurses. Implications: The fact that no differences were found between BSN and ADN nurses has important implications for nursing education as curricular revisions are considered. Nurse educators should assess current physical examination techniques taught within their curricula and consider being more selective of content presented. It may be more appropriate to focus on a smaller set of skills with a greater emphasis on recognition and interpretation of findings, particularly cues indicative of changes in patient status.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysical Examination Techniques: Does Education Make a Difference?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158169-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physical Examination Techniques: Does Education Make a Difference?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Giddens, Jean, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jgiddens@salud.unm.ed</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: Physical assessment is traditionally taught in greater depth in baccalaureate nursing programs compared to associate degree programs. However, many of the techniques taught are not routinely performed by nurses in clinical practice. The purpose of this cross-sectional exploratory research was to determine if differences exist in the frequency of physical assessment techniques performed by associate- and baccalaureate-prepared nurses. Rationale/Background: Rapid changes in health care have underscored the need for reform in health science education; nursing education is no exception. One of many problems cited is overcrowded curricula; thus an evaluation of content is necessary. Nurse educators must become more selective about content within nursing curricula. Methods: The sample for this study (N=96) was a subset of 193 randomly surveyed registered nurses employed in direct patient care roles (in both inpatient and outpatient settings) at a large university-based heath care facility in the Southwest who worked at least 20 hours a week. Data were collected using a 124-item survey of physical examination techniques; participants indicated the average frequency they performed the techniques. Each participant was contacted by the researcher and provided with a written and verbal explanation of the study along with assurances that participation was voluntary and that their responses would remain confidential. Individuals agreeing to participate completed the survey and were given a $5 gift certificate as compensation for their time and the information they provided. The survey contained no personal identifiers and was directly administered and collected by the researcher, preventing other individuals (such as nurse managers) from seeing individually completed forms. From the larger sample, 48 participants with a bachelor of science degree in nursing (BSN) were matched with 48 participants with an associate degree in nursing (ADN) by clinical area and years of experience to control for differences between the two groups. Results: The majority of the 96 participants was employed full time (81.4%) and worked in an inpatient hospital setting (90.4 %). The sample represented the following practice categories: adult, pediatric, perioperative, and maternal-infant. The number of years in clinical practice ranged from 0 to 24, with a mean of 10.8 (SD = 6.72) years. A Mann-Whitney test showed no differences in frequency of assessment categories performed by nurses representing these two groups. A small negative correlation was found between frequency and years of experience with the nutrition assessment category (rho = -.298, p = .003). These findings suggest that in-depth physical examination content taught in many baccalaureate nursing programs does not result in a difference in the examination techniques performed in practice by baccalaureate-prepared nurses compared with associate-prepared nurses. Implications: The fact that no differences were found between BSN and ADN nurses has important implications for nursing education as curricular revisions are considered. Nurse educators should assess current physical examination techniques taught within their curricula and consider being more selective of content presented. It may be more appropriate to focus on a smaller set of skills with a greater emphasis on recognition and interpretation of findings, particularly cues indicative of changes in patient status.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:34:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:34:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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