2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158170
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Water Fitness to Reduce Weight and Improve Blood Glucose
Abstract:
Water Fitness to Reduce Weight and Improve Blood Glucose
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Gilcreast, Darlene, RN, PhD, CDE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas HSC at San Antonio School of Nursing MC 7950
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Mary Z. (Kelly) Dunn
Purpose/Aim: Water aerobics was tested as a means to reduce weight and improve blood glucose in Type 2 diabetes. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Overweight is highly linked to uncontrolled diabetes and insulin resistance. Minorities, particularly African Americans and Hispanics, suffer disproportionately from the adverse effects of diabetes. Many overweight individuals are sedentary. Exercise has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and may help weight reduction. Method: A one-group pre/post-test pilot study was used. Dependent variables are: weight, hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1c), finger-stick blood glucose (pre and post exercise), lipid profile, body tape measurements, transcutaneous oxygen (TCpO2)/carbon dioxide (TCpCO2), scores on the Profile of Mood States, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and four YMCA fitness tests. The independent variable is: group water aerobics, 3 times per week for twelve weeks. The sample is 17 Hispanics and 17 African Americans, males and females, 40-65 years of age. This age is most-representative of people with T2DM. Results: Data for 17 subjects (2 males, 15 females) show initial weights of 163.7 to 287.4 lbs. Mean change in weight was a +0.62 lbs. (-12.3 to +10), p=ns. Height ranged from 59 inches to 70 inches. Initial BMI was 27.7 to 47.5. Change in BMI was +0.35 (-2.1 to +1.70) p=ns. Initial A1c levels were 6.1% to 11.3% (target <7%). Overall, A1c (n=12) was lowered by a mean -0.48% (-1.9% to +0.7%), p=.01. YMCA fitness tests showed: a) Dynamic Balance increased 10% (-47% to 71%), p=ns; b) 30-second chair stand improved by 2.7 stands (-3 to +10), p=.0025 c) 8-foot Get-Up-and-Go Test showed decreases in time to walk 16 feet by 3.0 seconds (-1.3 to +1.1), p=.05; and d) Arm Curls with a five pounds increased by 4.9 curls (-4 to +11), p=.0005. Other tests were not statistically significant. Mean inches lost were: (a) neck = -0.19 (-1.5 to +.75), (b) waist = -0.79 (-6 to 3.0), (c) hips = -0.56 (-4.0 to +3.0), (d) thighs = +0.45 (-2.25 to +4.25), (e) calves = -0.25 (-0.75 to +0.5). Mean TcpO2 decreased by 2mmHg (-29 to +29) and mean TcpCO2 increased by 1.25mmHg (-24 to +22). Mean daily change in blood glucose was -70 mg/dl/session (Range +22 to -111). Thus, changes in A1c and physical fitness tests were statistically significant, but not weight and other variables. Implications: All subjects reported exercise sessions were valuable and enjoyable. Five of the 17 subjects continued to exercise after the study. Therefore, water aerobics is an effective and pleasurable way to exercise regularly, reduce HgbA1c, and improve fitness; but it is not sufficient alone to achieve weight loss. It is believed by the investigators that participants who began with A1c >8.0% gained weight with exercise because calories previous lost in urine were stored as fat with a lower mean blood glucose.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWater Fitness to Reduce Weight and Improve Blood Glucoseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158170-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Water Fitness to Reduce Weight and Improve Blood Glucose</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gilcreast, Darlene, RN, PhD, CDE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas HSC at San Antonio School of Nursing MC 7950</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gilcreast@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Z. (Kelly) Dunn</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aim: Water aerobics was tested as a means to reduce weight and improve blood glucose in Type 2 diabetes. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Overweight is highly linked to uncontrolled diabetes and insulin resistance. Minorities, particularly African Americans and Hispanics, suffer disproportionately from the adverse effects of diabetes. Many overweight individuals are sedentary. Exercise has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and may help weight reduction. Method: A one-group pre/post-test pilot study was used. Dependent variables are: weight, hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1c), finger-stick blood glucose (pre and post exercise), lipid profile, body tape measurements, transcutaneous oxygen (TCpO2)/carbon dioxide (TCpCO2), scores on the Profile of Mood States, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and four YMCA fitness tests. The independent variable is: group water aerobics, 3 times per week for twelve weeks. The sample is 17 Hispanics and 17 African Americans, males and females, 40-65 years of age. This age is most-representative of people with T2DM. Results: Data for 17 subjects (2 males, 15 females) show initial weights of 163.7 to 287.4 lbs. Mean change in weight was a +0.62 lbs. (-12.3 to +10), p=ns. Height ranged from 59 inches to 70 inches. Initial BMI was 27.7 to 47.5. Change in BMI was +0.35 (-2.1 to +1.70) p=ns. Initial A1c levels were 6.1% to 11.3% (target &lt;7%). Overall, A1c (n=12) was lowered by a mean -0.48% (-1.9% to +0.7%), p=.01. YMCA fitness tests showed: a) Dynamic Balance increased 10% (-47% to 71%), p=ns; b) 30-second chair stand improved by 2.7 stands (-3 to +10), p=.0025 c) 8-foot Get-Up-and-Go Test showed decreases in time to walk 16 feet by 3.0 seconds (-1.3 to +1.1), p=.05; and d) Arm Curls with a five pounds increased by 4.9 curls (-4 to +11), p=.0005. Other tests were not statistically significant. Mean inches lost were: (a) neck = -0.19 (-1.5 to +.75), (b) waist = -0.79 (-6 to 3.0), (c) hips = -0.56 (-4.0 to +3.0), (d) thighs = +0.45 (-2.25 to +4.25), (e) calves = -0.25 (-0.75 to +0.5). Mean TcpO2 decreased by 2mmHg (-29 to +29) and mean TcpCO2 increased by 1.25mmHg (-24 to +22). Mean daily change in blood glucose was -70 mg/dl/session (Range +22 to -111). Thus, changes in A1c and physical fitness tests were statistically significant, but not weight and other variables. Implications: All subjects reported exercise sessions were valuable and enjoyable. Five of the 17 subjects continued to exercise after the study. Therefore, water aerobics is an effective and pleasurable way to exercise regularly, reduce HgbA1c, and improve fitness; but it is not sufficient alone to achieve weight loss. It is believed by the investigators that participants who began with A1c &gt;8.0% gained weight with exercise because calories previous lost in urine were stored as fat with a lower mean blood glucose.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:34:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:34:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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