Connectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Staying Connected or Not: The Student Perspective

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158171
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Connectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Staying Connected or Not: The Student Perspective
Abstract:
Connectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Staying Connected or Not: The Student Perspective
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Glennon, Cheryl, RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Arizona University Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Background/ Significance: Retention of students is a significant issue for university nursing programs. Intense student recruitment has sought to increase enrollments in traditional pre-licensure, fast track pre-licensure, graduate and certificate programs. Simultaneously, programs are increasingly using online education as a delivery method to reach more students. The Center for Study of College Student Retention reports that in 2000-2001 eighty-seven percent (87%) of four-year public institutions offered online-without-live-interaction education (2004). The challenge that emerges is how to retain the students who enroll, in particular, the distance online nursing students. A study of retention of adult and online students based on student surveys reported that students who are survivors are those who are stay connected (Tweedle, 2003). Both social integration i.e. close relationships with peers and faculty as well as academic integration (writing skills and study/computer skills) contributed to students staying connected. Included among the suggested retention strategies were: a good orientation including attention to computer skills, careful design of the first three courses to enhance sensitivity to the needs of adult learners, and cohesive support groups. The perception of students in specialized professional programs, such as nursing, would contribute to the research on this topic. The nursing program at Northern Arizona University is committed to its mission of serving rural areas, subsequently emerging as a regional innovator in online distance education. Consequently, the faculty has become intensely interested in student retention in both RN/BSN and graduate programs, both of which are delivered using an online format. In order to plan and implement meaningful, effective measures to increase retention, the student perspective is considered essential. Research question: What is the student rationale for online course withdrawal including the types of support to retain nursing students? Methods: Students who have withdrawn from a course(s) are invited to complete a survey either online or in hard copy for return mail. The student services office staff manages the survey administration each semester. Since the survey is new, a pilot is underway with results anticipated by the end of the fall semester 2004. The survey consists of 15 items in varying formats from check box to open-ended questions. Demographics data are included. Results: Initial data is expected to yield quantifiable data as well as rich description. Faculty anticipates using results use to design responsive and innovative measures to improve curriculum and well as pedagogical approaches to the online student experience. It is further anticipated that results will be shared with the university distance education staff to contribute to enhancements of the general university population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConnectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Staying Connected or Not: The Student Perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158171-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Connectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Staying Connected or Not: The Student Perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Glennon, Cheryl, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Arizona University Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cheryl.glennon@nau.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background/ Significance: Retention of students is a significant issue for university nursing programs. Intense student recruitment has sought to increase enrollments in traditional pre-licensure, fast track pre-licensure, graduate and certificate programs. Simultaneously, programs are increasingly using online education as a delivery method to reach more students. The Center for Study of College Student Retention reports that in 2000-2001 eighty-seven percent (87%) of four-year public institutions offered online-without-live-interaction education (2004). The challenge that emerges is how to retain the students who enroll, in particular, the distance online nursing students. A study of retention of adult and online students based on student surveys reported that students who are survivors are those who are stay connected (Tweedle, 2003). Both social integration i.e. close relationships with peers and faculty as well as academic integration (writing skills and study/computer skills) contributed to students staying connected. Included among the suggested retention strategies were: a good orientation including attention to computer skills, careful design of the first three courses to enhance sensitivity to the needs of adult learners, and cohesive support groups. The perception of students in specialized professional programs, such as nursing, would contribute to the research on this topic. The nursing program at Northern Arizona University is committed to its mission of serving rural areas, subsequently emerging as a regional innovator in online distance education. Consequently, the faculty has become intensely interested in student retention in both RN/BSN and graduate programs, both of which are delivered using an online format. In order to plan and implement meaningful, effective measures to increase retention, the student perspective is considered essential. Research question: What is the student rationale for online course withdrawal including the types of support to retain nursing students? Methods: Students who have withdrawn from a course(s) are invited to complete a survey either online or in hard copy for return mail. The student services office staff manages the survey administration each semester. Since the survey is new, a pilot is underway with results anticipated by the end of the fall semester 2004. The survey consists of 15 items in varying formats from check box to open-ended questions. Demographics data are included. Results: Initial data is expected to yield quantifiable data as well as rich description. Faculty anticipates using results use to design responsive and innovative measures to improve curriculum and well as pedagogical approaches to the online student experience. It is further anticipated that results will be shared with the university distance education staff to contribute to enhancements of the general university population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:34:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:34:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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