2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158172
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sociocultural Context of Exercise in Older Mexican-American Women
Abstract:
Sociocultural Context of Exercise in Older Mexican-American Women
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Gonzales, Adelita, RN, PhD(c)
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas HSC at San Antonio
Title:Clinical Instructor
Co-Authors:Colleen Keller, K. Jill Fleuriet
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study is to describe physical activity in the context of the daily lives of older Mexican-American women. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: In the United States today, racial/ethnic minorities often experience disparity in health status when compared to their majority non-Hispanic white counterparts. Those same racial/ethnic minorities are expected to grow both in numbers and when calculated as a proportion of the total US population. Therefore, both the qualitative health of our nation and the cost of health care will be influenced substantially by our success in improving the health of these racial/ethnic minorities. Healthy People 2010, the federal program which defines the health objectives for the US in the 21st century, states that we must eliminate health disparities, particularly among minorities. To this end, we must identify the underlying causes of chronic disease and mortality in minorities in order to successfully plan prevention strategies. If we are to promote good health, we must recognize that a physically inactive lifestyle is an independent predictor of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). Older Mexican-American women experience disproportionately high morbidity and mortality rates from CVD and are among the least physically active segment of the population. To reduce health disparities in this group, it is essential that we examine the socio-cultural patterns that validate inactivity and identify those patterns that will promote the initiation and maintenance of physical activity. The conceptual orientation that underpins this study is based on the idea that specific racial/ethnic groups will have unique perceptions that influence behaviors, such as initiation and maintenance of physical activity. Methods: The investigator used an ethnographic life history approach in order to understand the unique experience and worldview of older Mexican-American women regarding physical activity. Using Spradley's developmental research sequence, the investigator analyzed data for measures of cultural similarities and variations. Results: Six measurement tools described the sample: 1) A Demographic Data Sheet; 2) The Hollingshead Four Factor Inventory Socioeconomic; 3) The Stanford 7-day Recall; 4) and 5) The Friend Support for Exercise Scale and the Family Support for Exercise Scale will assess social support for exercise; and 6) The Hazuda Acculturation and Assimilation Scale will be used to measure the participant's level of acculturation. Cultural similarities and variations are described. Implications: This study is important for research in health disparities because it delineates psychological, socio-cultural, environmental, and/or physiological processes and patterns which affect the initiation and maintenance of physical activity for those in the study sample. This knowledge will aid researchers and program planners in designing health promotion interventions that are culturally relevant to older Mexican-American women
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSociocultural Context of Exercise in Older Mexican-American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158172-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sociocultural Context of Exercise in Older Mexican-American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gonzales, Adelita, RN, PhD(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas HSC at San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gonzalesa3@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Colleen Keller, K. Jill Fleuriet</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study is to describe physical activity in the context of the daily lives of older Mexican-American women. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: In the United States today, racial/ethnic minorities often experience disparity in health status when compared to their majority non-Hispanic white counterparts. Those same racial/ethnic minorities are expected to grow both in numbers and when calculated as a proportion of the total US population. Therefore, both the qualitative health of our nation and the cost of health care will be influenced substantially by our success in improving the health of these racial/ethnic minorities. Healthy People 2010, the federal program which defines the health objectives for the US in the 21st century, states that we must eliminate health disparities, particularly among minorities. To this end, we must identify the underlying causes of chronic disease and mortality in minorities in order to successfully plan prevention strategies. If we are to promote good health, we must recognize that a physically inactive lifestyle is an independent predictor of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). Older Mexican-American women experience disproportionately high morbidity and mortality rates from CVD and are among the least physically active segment of the population. To reduce health disparities in this group, it is essential that we examine the socio-cultural patterns that validate inactivity and identify those patterns that will promote the initiation and maintenance of physical activity. The conceptual orientation that underpins this study is based on the idea that specific racial/ethnic groups will have unique perceptions that influence behaviors, such as initiation and maintenance of physical activity. Methods: The investigator used an ethnographic life history approach in order to understand the unique experience and worldview of older Mexican-American women regarding physical activity. Using Spradley's developmental research sequence, the investigator analyzed data for measures of cultural similarities and variations. Results: Six measurement tools described the sample: 1) A Demographic Data Sheet; 2) The Hollingshead Four Factor Inventory Socioeconomic; 3) The Stanford 7-day Recall; 4) and 5) The Friend Support for Exercise Scale and the Family Support for Exercise Scale will assess social support for exercise; and 6) The Hazuda Acculturation and Assimilation Scale will be used to measure the participant's level of acculturation. Cultural similarities and variations are described. Implications: This study is important for research in health disparities because it delineates psychological, socio-cultural, environmental, and/or physiological processes and patterns which affect the initiation and maintenance of physical activity for those in the study sample. This knowledge will aid researchers and program planners in designing health promotion interventions that are culturally relevant to older Mexican-American women</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:34:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:34:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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