Test Validity of Clinical Format of Emotional Availability Framework, Yuqing Guo, "MSN", Western Institute of Nursing,

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158174
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Test Validity of Clinical Format of Emotional Availability Framework, Yuqing Guo, "MSN", Western Institute of Nursing,
Abstract:
Test Validity of Clinical Format of Emotional Availability Framework, Yuqing Guo, "MSN", Western Institute of Nursing,
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Guo, Yuqing, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Title:Early Head Start Research Assistant and Doctoral Student
Co-Authors:Kathryn E. Barnard, JoAnne Solchany
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study was to test the validity of a clinical format of a Emotional Availability Framework. The specific aim of this study was to compare categorizations of the clinical format of Emotional Availability Framework with scores of its research scale format. Background: Seven to twenty five percent of 2- and 3- year-old children exhibit behavioral problems. To better detect the very young children's problems, observations of parent-child interactions should be considered a critical component and integrated in the clinical setting. The conceptualization of emotional availability was created to assess the parent-child relationship in the last decade. The clinical format of assessing Emotional Availability was developed based on its research format. Methods: The secondary analysis with instrument validation design was used in this study. The data observed was video-taped episodes of parent-child play interaction collected for the "On My Mind" project by Dr. Kathryn Barnard. The 20-minute interaction was filmed at a Childcare Center where the child was enrolled. The children ranged in age from 4 months to 23 months. A research coder and the author (Y.Q.G) as the clinical coder independently rated the 20 cases. The clinical coder's categorizations were compared with the research coder's scores using criteria for converting the research scoring to the clinical categorization of levels of emotional availability. To achieve the criterion-related validity evidence, the percentage of agreement was calculated. Results: Among 20 cases, categorizations of 16 cases by the clinical ratings were congruent with the scores by the research ratings. Percentage of agreement was 80%. One of the main reasons for disagreement was due to the vague and not specific criterion of overall impressions in the clinical format of Emotional Availability Framework. Implications: It is typical practice for nursing to make observations of parent-child interaction in the clinical setting without the advantage of carefully controlled laboratory conditions. Results suggested that clinical Emotional Availability Framework would be a promising alternative for nursing clinicians to assess parent-child interaction, while its clinical application needs more exploration on how to specifically operationalize and also easily observe and rate the overall impression in the clinical setting. Theoretically, the results offered a perspective on the relationship between a research measure and a clinical measure. When a clinical measure is transformed from its research format, the emphasis between them is different: detailed analysis vs. overall impression of the phenomenon. Therefore, when a nurse uses a clinical measure transformed from its research format, there may be two processes to go through: separating (understand an abstract phenomenon through separating a construct to observable dimensions) and generalizing (judge the overall impression of the phenomenon through generalizing features of observable dimensions). In this sense, the combination of research and practice offers nurses a more integrated and unique approach to explore the human phenomenon.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTest Validity of Clinical Format of Emotional Availability Framework, Yuqing Guo, "MSN", Western Institute of Nursing,en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158174-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Test Validity of Clinical Format of Emotional Availability Framework, Yuqing Guo, &quot;MSN&quot;, Western Institute of Nursing,</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Guo, Yuqing, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Early Head Start Research Assistant and Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yg4@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathryn E. Barnard, JoAnne Solchany</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study was to test the validity of a clinical format of a Emotional Availability Framework. The specific aim of this study was to compare categorizations of the clinical format of Emotional Availability Framework with scores of its research scale format. Background: Seven to twenty five percent of 2- and 3- year-old children exhibit behavioral problems. To better detect the very young children's problems, observations of parent-child interactions should be considered a critical component and integrated in the clinical setting. The conceptualization of emotional availability was created to assess the parent-child relationship in the last decade. The clinical format of assessing Emotional Availability was developed based on its research format. Methods: The secondary analysis with instrument validation design was used in this study. The data observed was video-taped episodes of parent-child play interaction collected for the &quot;On My Mind&quot; project by Dr. Kathryn Barnard. The 20-minute interaction was filmed at a Childcare Center where the child was enrolled. The children ranged in age from 4 months to 23 months. A research coder and the author (Y.Q.G) as the clinical coder independently rated the 20 cases. The clinical coder's categorizations were compared with the research coder's scores using criteria for converting the research scoring to the clinical categorization of levels of emotional availability. To achieve the criterion-related validity evidence, the percentage of agreement was calculated. Results: Among 20 cases, categorizations of 16 cases by the clinical ratings were congruent with the scores by the research ratings. Percentage of agreement was 80%. One of the main reasons for disagreement was due to the vague and not specific criterion of overall impressions in the clinical format of Emotional Availability Framework. Implications: It is typical practice for nursing to make observations of parent-child interaction in the clinical setting without the advantage of carefully controlled laboratory conditions. Results suggested that clinical Emotional Availability Framework would be a promising alternative for nursing clinicians to assess parent-child interaction, while its clinical application needs more exploration on how to specifically operationalize and also easily observe and rate the overall impression in the clinical setting. Theoretically, the results offered a perspective on the relationship between a research measure and a clinical measure. When a clinical measure is transformed from its research format, the emphasis between them is different: detailed analysis vs. overall impression of the phenomenon. Therefore, when a nurse uses a clinical measure transformed from its research format, there may be two processes to go through: separating (understand an abstract phenomenon through separating a construct to observable dimensions) and generalizing (judge the overall impression of the phenomenon through generalizing features of observable dimensions). In this sense, the combination of research and practice offers nurses a more integrated and unique approach to explore the human phenomenon.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:34:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:34:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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