Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Strength Factors Among Women of Mexican Descent

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158178
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Strength Factors Among Women of Mexican Descent
Abstract:
Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Strength Factors Among Women of Mexican Descent
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Heilemann, Mary Sue, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Factor Building, Room 5-252
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Kathryn A. Lee, Felix S. Kury
Purpose/Aims: The objective of this study with immigrant and U.S.-born women of Mexican descent was to describe their positive strengths. The Vulnerable Populations Conceptual Model provided a theoretical framework for the analysis of relationships between strength characteristics, health-related risks, health-related resources, and self-assessed health status. Rationale: The majority of research among women of Mexican descent has focused on risk factors without considering intrinsic strength factors that may have a protective effect. The few studies with Latina samples that have included strength factors rarely include acculturation as a variable in the same study. Therefore, a focus on intrinsic strengths and assets such as mastery, resilience, life satisfaction, and vitality in relation to acculturation in research holds promise for a fuller understanding of the health and well-being of women of Mexican descent beyond deficits, risks, and problems. Methods: Survey methods were used to examine cross sectional data from a convenience sample of 315 urban, women of Mexican descent living with low incomes in the U.S. Strength characteristics included Resilience (conceptualized as Personal Competence and Acceptance of Self and Life), Sense of Mastery, Life Satisfaction, and Perceived Level of Energy (or vitality). These characteristics were examined at the individual level, in relation to resources (adequacy of income, education, and having a partner), risk factors (acculturation and substance use), and health status (self perception of having/not having a "health problem"). Results: Women who were U.S-born had lower Life Satisfaction and lower Perceived Energy levels, despite greater Sense of Mastery, than Mexico-born women. Women who perceived their financial resources to be sufficient reported higher levels of every strength characteristic included in this study, compared to women who perceived their financial resources to be insufficient. Women who perceived themselves as having a "health problem" reported lower levels of all strength characteristics except Mastery. Implications: Mastery was higher for women who preferred English which may signal a greater ability not just to speak and read the English language, but a greater ease with, or mastery of, the use of English in various contexts in American living. Although "income" as a variable is typically included in research with Latinos, our research demonstrates that the more refined factor of "adequacy of financial resources to meet needs in the previous month" was more informative about strength characteristics among this sample of women of Mexican descent. Lower Life Satisfaction and Perceived Energy for more acculturated women based on birthplace in the U.S. point out that not all effects of acculturation are positive. This research draws attention to the importance of including both acculturation and personal strength factors in studies with women of Mexican descent in order to gain a deeper understanding of intra-group differences.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Strength Factors Among Women of Mexican Descenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158178-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Strength Factors Among Women of Mexican Descent</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Heilemann, Mary Sue, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Factor Building, Room 5-252</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mheilema@ucla.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathryn A. Lee, Felix S. Kury</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The objective of this study with immigrant and U.S.-born women of Mexican descent was to describe their positive strengths. The Vulnerable Populations Conceptual Model provided a theoretical framework for the analysis of relationships between strength characteristics, health-related risks, health-related resources, and self-assessed health status. Rationale: The majority of research among women of Mexican descent has focused on risk factors without considering intrinsic strength factors that may have a protective effect. The few studies with Latina samples that have included strength factors rarely include acculturation as a variable in the same study. Therefore, a focus on intrinsic strengths and assets such as mastery, resilience, life satisfaction, and vitality in relation to acculturation in research holds promise for a fuller understanding of the health and well-being of women of Mexican descent beyond deficits, risks, and problems. Methods: Survey methods were used to examine cross sectional data from a convenience sample of 315 urban, women of Mexican descent living with low incomes in the U.S. Strength characteristics included Resilience (conceptualized as Personal Competence and Acceptance of Self and Life), Sense of Mastery, Life Satisfaction, and Perceived Level of Energy (or vitality). These characteristics were examined at the individual level, in relation to resources (adequacy of income, education, and having a partner), risk factors (acculturation and substance use), and health status (self perception of having/not having a &quot;health problem&quot;). Results: Women who were U.S-born had lower Life Satisfaction and lower Perceived Energy levels, despite greater Sense of Mastery, than Mexico-born women. Women who perceived their financial resources to be sufficient reported higher levels of every strength characteristic included in this study, compared to women who perceived their financial resources to be insufficient. Women who perceived themselves as having a &quot;health problem&quot; reported lower levels of all strength characteristics except Mastery. Implications: Mastery was higher for women who preferred English which may signal a greater ability not just to speak and read the English language, but a greater ease with, or mastery of, the use of English in various contexts in American living. Although &quot;income&quot; as a variable is typically included in research with Latinos, our research demonstrates that the more refined factor of &quot;adequacy of financial resources to meet needs in the previous month&quot; was more informative about strength characteristics among this sample of women of Mexican descent. Lower Life Satisfaction and Perceived Energy for more acculturated women based on birthplace in the U.S. point out that not all effects of acculturation are positive. This research draws attention to the importance of including both acculturation and personal strength factors in studies with women of Mexican descent in order to gain a deeper understanding of intra-group differences.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:35:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:35:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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