The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Overview

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158179
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Overview
Abstract:
The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Overview
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hill, Wade, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University - Bozeman College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
In September of 2000, the Pew Environmental Health Commission published their report entitled America's Environmental Health Gap: Why the Country Needs a Nationwide Health Tracking Network. This report describes an "environmental health gap" in the United States whereby public health systems currently lack basic information that could document links between environmental hazards and chronic disease and that a nation-wide health-tracking system would help fill this gap. Components of an environmental public health tracking network would include baseline tracking of human exposure and outcomes, an early warning system for critical environmental health threats, statewide pilot tracking programs to test disease, exposure and tracking approaches, federal investigation for rapid-response capacity, and tracking links to the communities and research. The report also suggests that a comprehensive tracking network would advance our ability to identify populations at risk and respond to outbreaks, clusters and emerging threats; establish the relationship between environmental hazards and disease; guide intervention and prevention strategies, including lifestyle improvements; identify, reduce and prevent harmful environmental risks; improve the public health basis for policymaking; enable the public's right to know about health and the environment; and track progress towards achieving a healthier nation and environment. Based in part on the report by the Environmental Health Tracking Project Team, Congress provided the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with $17.5 million in fiscal year 2002 to begin developing a nationwide environmental public health tracking network and to build capacity in environmental health within state and local health departments. Subsequently, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) and Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) submitted an application to the CDC for funding in August 2002 for planning and building capacity for an Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) System. Montana was one of 17 sites awarded funding to participate in building a national Public Health Tracking network in October 2002.Early work in Montana to build capacity for the establishment of a EPHT system focused on assessment of technological capacities in the state, identifying data sources that could have relevance to EPHT, and solve problems such as linking databases with differing formats and data elements. A state-wide needs assessment has also been conducted to solicit input from citizens, individual counties, and the public health workforce. This symposium discusses results from an assessment conducted for three populations of the public health workforce in Montana including public health nurses, sanitarians, and county health officers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Overviewen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158179-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Overview</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hill, Wade, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University - Bozeman College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">whill@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In September of 2000, the Pew Environmental Health Commission published their report entitled America's Environmental Health Gap: Why the Country Needs a Nationwide Health Tracking Network. This report describes an &quot;environmental health gap&quot; in the United States whereby public health systems currently lack basic information that could document links between environmental hazards and chronic disease and that a nation-wide health-tracking system would help fill this gap. Components of an environmental public health tracking network would include baseline tracking of human exposure and outcomes, an early warning system for critical environmental health threats, statewide pilot tracking programs to test disease, exposure and tracking approaches, federal investigation for rapid-response capacity, and tracking links to the communities and research. The report also suggests that a comprehensive tracking network would advance our ability to identify populations at risk and respond to outbreaks, clusters and emerging threats; establish the relationship between environmental hazards and disease; guide intervention and prevention strategies, including lifestyle improvements; identify, reduce and prevent harmful environmental risks; improve the public health basis for policymaking; enable the public's right to know about health and the environment; and track progress towards achieving a healthier nation and environment. Based in part on the report by the Environmental Health Tracking Project Team, Congress provided the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with $17.5 million in fiscal year 2002 to begin developing a nationwide environmental public health tracking network and to build capacity in environmental health within state and local health departments. Subsequently, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) and Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) submitted an application to the CDC for funding in August 2002 for planning and building capacity for an Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) System. Montana was one of 17 sites awarded funding to participate in building a national Public Health Tracking network in October 2002.Early work in Montana to build capacity for the establishment of a EPHT system focused on assessment of technological capacities in the state, identifying data sources that could have relevance to EPHT, and solve problems such as linking databases with differing formats and data elements. A state-wide needs assessment has also been conducted to solicit input from citizens, individual counties, and the public health workforce. This symposium discusses results from an assessment conducted for three populations of the public health workforce in Montana including public health nurses, sanitarians, and county health officers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:35:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:35:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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