The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Priority Environmental Health Concerns for Montana Public Health Workers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158180
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Priority Environmental Health Concerns for Montana Public Health Workers
Abstract:
The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Priority Environmental Health Concerns for Montana Public Health Workers
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hill, Wade, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University - Bozeman College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Problem: The successful establishment of an environmental public health tracking system in Montana requires active participation of public health workers and the development of pilot tracking systems that allow existing environmental exposure data to be linked with existing health outcome data. Understanding priority environmental health concerns among Montana public health workers will allow the Environmental Public Health Tracking effort to focus pilot efforts on specific exposure/health outcome patterns that will address ranking concerns of the public health workforce and engage workforce in participation. Description of Project: Survey methods were employed to identify perceptions of priority environmental exposures and health effects among public health nurses, sanitarians, and health officers in the state of Montana. Tailored instruments were developed for each population based on input from working members of each group, the Montana Environmental Public Health Tracking Advisory Committee, and discussions with other states engaged in parallel efforts. A multi-mode (web-based & paper/pencil) survey was administered to each of the three populations formatted and delivered according to the Dillman Method. Response rates were 60% (n = 33) for health officers, 65% (n = 91) for sanitarians, and 76% (n = 163) for public health nurses. Findings: The majority of subjects were female (67%), between the ages of 25-54 (67%), and Caucasian (86%). For the entire sample, priority environmental exposures where respondents stated that they were 'very concerned' included tobacco smoke in homes with children (61%), drinking water contamination (51%), and toxic contaminates in foods (47%). Exposures with the fewest number of people indicating that they were 'very concerned' include chemical spills (25%), air pollutants such as carbon monoxide, lead, ozone, or sulfur dioxide (18%), and motor vehicle emissions (14%). Priority health effects (very concerned) include disease outbreaks attributed to food and water contamination (55%), cancer (47%), and respiratory diseases (44%). Health effects of least concern include developmental diseases (25%), dermatitis (21%), and infertility (13%). Differences were found between the groups in their perceptions of ranking exposures and health effects. While all groups listed drinking water contamination in their top two exposure concerns, nurses and health officers included tobacco smoke in homes with children while sanitarians listed toxic contaminates in foods in their ranking. For health effects, all three groups identified disease outbreaks attributed to food and water contamination in their top two concerns and nurses and sanitarians identified cancer second. Health officers indicated that the second of their top two concerns was respiratory disease. Implications: Results from this survey indicate that public health workers in Montana report some consistent patterns of priority environmental exposures and health effects. These patterns should be considered when designing pilot EPHT projects linking existing environmental and health data.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Priority Environmental Health Concerns for Montana Public Health Workersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158180-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking: Priority Environmental Health Concerns for Montana Public Health Workers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hill, Wade, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University - Bozeman College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">whill@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: The successful establishment of an environmental public health tracking system in Montana requires active participation of public health workers and the development of pilot tracking systems that allow existing environmental exposure data to be linked with existing health outcome data. Understanding priority environmental health concerns among Montana public health workers will allow the Environmental Public Health Tracking effort to focus pilot efforts on specific exposure/health outcome patterns that will address ranking concerns of the public health workforce and engage workforce in participation. Description of Project: Survey methods were employed to identify perceptions of priority environmental exposures and health effects among public health nurses, sanitarians, and health officers in the state of Montana. Tailored instruments were developed for each population based on input from working members of each group, the Montana Environmental Public Health Tracking Advisory Committee, and discussions with other states engaged in parallel efforts. A multi-mode (web-based &amp; paper/pencil) survey was administered to each of the three populations formatted and delivered according to the Dillman Method. Response rates were 60% (n = 33) for health officers, 65% (n = 91) for sanitarians, and 76% (n = 163) for public health nurses. Findings: The majority of subjects were female (67%), between the ages of 25-54 (67%), and Caucasian (86%). For the entire sample, priority environmental exposures where respondents stated that they were 'very concerned' included tobacco smoke in homes with children (61%), drinking water contamination (51%), and toxic contaminates in foods (47%). Exposures with the fewest number of people indicating that they were 'very concerned' include chemical spills (25%), air pollutants such as carbon monoxide, lead, ozone, or sulfur dioxide (18%), and motor vehicle emissions (14%). Priority health effects (very concerned) include disease outbreaks attributed to food and water contamination (55%), cancer (47%), and respiratory diseases (44%). Health effects of least concern include developmental diseases (25%), dermatitis (21%), and infertility (13%). Differences were found between the groups in their perceptions of ranking exposures and health effects. While all groups listed drinking water contamination in their top two exposure concerns, nurses and health officers included tobacco smoke in homes with children while sanitarians listed toxic contaminates in foods in their ranking. For health effects, all three groups identified disease outbreaks attributed to food and water contamination in their top two concerns and nurses and sanitarians identified cancer second. Health officers indicated that the second of their top two concerns was respiratory disease. Implications: Results from this survey indicate that public health workers in Montana report some consistent patterns of priority environmental exposures and health effects. These patterns should be considered when designing pilot EPHT projects linking existing environmental and health data.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:35:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:35:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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