2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158181
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rural Mexican American Women: Explanatory Models of Eating, Weight and Health
Abstract:
Rural Mexican American Women: Explanatory Models of Eating, Weight and Health
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hoke, Mary, PhD, MSN, RN-BC, APRN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:New Mexico State University, Dept of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Gayle M. Timmerman
Purposes/Aims: Obesity is disproportionately a problem for Mexican American women with 69.4% classified as overweight (www.cdc.gov). While several studies address the nutritional content of the typical Mexican American diet and changes with acculturation, few studies have looked at the meaning of eating behaviors within this group. The purpose of this exploratory study was to describe the explanatory models (EMs) of rural Mexican American women regarding how eating behavior relates to weight and health. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: Adapted from Kleinman's EMs of illness, EMs for this study are individuals' culturally based explanations about relationships of eating behavior and health. EMs provide a framework for understanding rural Mexican American women's beliefs about the benefits and barriers of healthy eating for the purposes of weight management. Methods: A convenience sample of 15 overweight Mexican American women from rural New Mexico were interviewed. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Content was categorized and compared by categories until consensus was reached by both investigators. The themes which emerged were validated with study participants. Results: Participants reported past practices for managing weight included physical activity (both work and exercise activities), limiting food intake, and use of diet pills. When asked how these activities helped manage weight (etiology), responses were based on personal experiences rather than biomedical explanations. Participants reiterated what behaviors (e.g., gained weight when less active) were helpful but most could not verbalize why or how the behaviors assisted in weight management. When asked what they hoped to achieve by eating healthy (consequences), improvements in self-esteem (e.g., feel better about self, appearance) was the predominant theme. Weight loss, having more energy, and improving health were also noted. When asked how eating behaviors affect health, the vast majority identified increased risk for specific diseases (diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease). Short term physical effects, such as energy and functional levels, were also mentioned. When asked what gets in the way of healthy eating (influencing factors), participants identified multiple barriers: 1) stress; 2) lack of self-control; 3) effort; 4) control by others now and in the past; 5) social influences; and 6) cultural influences. Implications: Rural Mexican American women have a basic understanding about the importance of reducing food intake and engaging in physical activity for weight management. They are also aware of the long term health risks of obesity. However, the barriers to healthy eating and exercise may be a critical area to address. EMs are one method for understanding the client's perspective which is needed to develop culturally appropriate weight management interventions. Funding Support: The pilot study was funded through a National Institute of Nursing Research P20 grant, NR0 8352-01, Southwest Partnership Center.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRural Mexican American Women: Explanatory Models of Eating, Weight and Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158181-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rural Mexican American Women: Explanatory Models of Eating, Weight and Health</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hoke, Mary, PhD, MSN, RN-BC, APRN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">New Mexico State University, Dept of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mhoke@nmsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gayle M. Timmerman</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: Obesity is disproportionately a problem for Mexican American women with 69.4% classified as overweight (www.cdc.gov). While several studies address the nutritional content of the typical Mexican American diet and changes with acculturation, few studies have looked at the meaning of eating behaviors within this group. The purpose of this exploratory study was to describe the explanatory models (EMs) of rural Mexican American women regarding how eating behavior relates to weight and health. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: Adapted from Kleinman's EMs of illness, EMs for this study are individuals' culturally based explanations about relationships of eating behavior and health. EMs provide a framework for understanding rural Mexican American women's beliefs about the benefits and barriers of healthy eating for the purposes of weight management. Methods: A convenience sample of 15 overweight Mexican American women from rural New Mexico were interviewed. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Content was categorized and compared by categories until consensus was reached by both investigators. The themes which emerged were validated with study participants. Results: Participants reported past practices for managing weight included physical activity (both work and exercise activities), limiting food intake, and use of diet pills. When asked how these activities helped manage weight (etiology), responses were based on personal experiences rather than biomedical explanations. Participants reiterated what behaviors (e.g., gained weight when less active) were helpful but most could not verbalize why or how the behaviors assisted in weight management. When asked what they hoped to achieve by eating healthy (consequences), improvements in self-esteem (e.g., feel better about self, appearance) was the predominant theme. Weight loss, having more energy, and improving health were also noted. When asked how eating behaviors affect health, the vast majority identified increased risk for specific diseases (diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease). Short term physical effects, such as energy and functional levels, were also mentioned. When asked what gets in the way of healthy eating (influencing factors), participants identified multiple barriers: 1) stress; 2) lack of self-control; 3) effort; 4) control by others now and in the past; 5) social influences; and 6) cultural influences. Implications: Rural Mexican American women have a basic understanding about the importance of reducing food intake and engaging in physical activity for weight management. They are also aware of the long term health risks of obesity. However, the barriers to healthy eating and exercise may be a critical area to address. EMs are one method for understanding the client's perspective which is needed to develop culturally appropriate weight management interventions. Funding Support: The pilot study was funded through a National Institute of Nursing Research P20 grant, NR0 8352-01, Southwest Partnership Center.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:35:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:35:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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