2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158182
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Partnering with a Tribal Community to Address Elder Mistreatment Concerns
Abstract:
Partnering with a Tribal Community to Address Elder Mistreatment Concerns
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Holkup, Patricia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Missoula
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Clarann Weinert, Toni Tripp-Reimer, Emily Matt Salois
Purpose: This Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) project is a part of a larger project to develop and evaluate family conference models for frail Native American elders at risk of mistreatment because chronic and debilitating illnesses have forced them to become dependent on younger family members. The purpose of this presentation is methodological in focus and aims to describe those complexities inherent in the CBPR approach that were encountered during this portion of our research. Background: CBPR involves full and equal partnership between community members and scientists in problem identification; development of mutual goals that are relevant to both the participating community and the scientific community; project development; data collection; data analysis; and the dissemination of results. CBPR balances research with action that is relevant, tangible and beneficial to the community. These characteristics make CBPR an appealing model for research with vulnerable populations. However, CBPR is not without special challenges related to scientific, ethical, and interpersonal issues that must be addressed for successful project development and outcome. Methods: The participants for the methodological focus of this project were the four members of the research team including one Native social worker and three non-Native nurses representing two universities. Data sources included direct and participant observations; intensive interviews of 27 individuals; minutes from 18 research team meetings; two formal and multiple informal research team reflections; correspondence between the team and the IRB; informed consents; and a research team negotiated Memorandum of Understanding. Thematic analysis was used to analyze this verbal data. Results: Challenges encountered and addressed during this project included the need for: a) flexibility and self-awareness; b) equitable collaboration through sharing authority, responsibility, and credit for success; c) management of role and credibility stress; d) addressing ethical issues related to informed consent, confidentiality, and ownership of intellectual property; d) a multicultural orientation to cultural issues; e) addressing threatening aspects of project related community change; and g) management of the time commitment demanded by a CBPR project. Implications: Implications for future nursing research include the need to: explore and understand culturally sensitive approaches for conducting research with Native people; find approaches for developing tribally specific frameworks into which the Family Care Conference may be embedded for use by diverse tribes; determine the most effective means of facilitating the FCC intervention, for example through the use of people who would be considered natural helpers vs. professionally prepared Tribal people; educate nurse scientists regarding the multiple ethical, interpersonal, and scientific complexities of conducting CBPR; promote policy changes that allow appropriate funding for this time consuming research approach; and advocate for institutional changes that will foster culturally sensitive community-based research approaches.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePartnering with a Tribal Community to Address Elder Mistreatment Concernsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158182-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Partnering with a Tribal Community to Address Elder Mistreatment Concerns</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Holkup, Patricia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Missoula</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pholkup@montana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Clarann Weinert, Toni Tripp-Reimer, Emily Matt Salois</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) project is a part of a larger project to develop and evaluate family conference models for frail Native American elders at risk of mistreatment because chronic and debilitating illnesses have forced them to become dependent on younger family members. The purpose of this presentation is methodological in focus and aims to describe those complexities inherent in the CBPR approach that were encountered during this portion of our research. Background: CBPR involves full and equal partnership between community members and scientists in problem identification; development of mutual goals that are relevant to both the participating community and the scientific community; project development; data collection; data analysis; and the dissemination of results. CBPR balances research with action that is relevant, tangible and beneficial to the community. These characteristics make CBPR an appealing model for research with vulnerable populations. However, CBPR is not without special challenges related to scientific, ethical, and interpersonal issues that must be addressed for successful project development and outcome. Methods: The participants for the methodological focus of this project were the four members of the research team including one Native social worker and three non-Native nurses representing two universities. Data sources included direct and participant observations; intensive interviews of 27 individuals; minutes from 18 research team meetings; two formal and multiple informal research team reflections; correspondence between the team and the IRB; informed consents; and a research team negotiated Memorandum of Understanding. Thematic analysis was used to analyze this verbal data. Results: Challenges encountered and addressed during this project included the need for: a) flexibility and self-awareness; b) equitable collaboration through sharing authority, responsibility, and credit for success; c) management of role and credibility stress; d) addressing ethical issues related to informed consent, confidentiality, and ownership of intellectual property; d) a multicultural orientation to cultural issues; e) addressing threatening aspects of project related community change; and g) management of the time commitment demanded by a CBPR project. Implications: Implications for future nursing research include the need to: explore and understand culturally sensitive approaches for conducting research with Native people; find approaches for developing tribally specific frameworks into which the Family Care Conference may be embedded for use by diverse tribes; determine the most effective means of facilitating the FCC intervention, for example through the use of people who would be considered natural helpers vs. professionally prepared Tribal people; educate nurse scientists regarding the multiple ethical, interpersonal, and scientific complexities of conducting CBPR; promote policy changes that allow appropriate funding for this time consuming research approach; and advocate for institutional changes that will foster culturally sensitive community-based research approaches.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:35:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:35:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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