Multiple Approaches to Assessing the Nursing Work Environment: The Arizona Nursing Workforce Survey: A Qualitative Analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158183
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multiple Approaches to Assessing the Nursing Work Environment: The Arizona Nursing Workforce Survey: A Qualitative Analysis
Abstract:
Multiple Approaches to Assessing the Nursing Work Environment: The Arizona Nursing Workforce Survey: A Qualitative Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hrabe, David, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Study Aims: The study aims were to: (1) identify factors which would motivate nurses who have left nursing to return to work in healthcare and (2) describe dis-satisfiers and proposed solutions by practicing nurses. Background: The Arizona State Board of Nursing commissioned a pilot study to examine nursing workforce trends and needs of Arizona's nurses. The survey collected demographic data, information about current employment, plans to continue working in nursing and opinions about a number of variables (e.g. work intensity, adequacy of staffing, compensation). Over 12,000 surveys were returned; analysis of quantitative variables is incomplete. This report focuses on narrative responses to two items: "If you are not employed in nursing, what would it take to get you to return to the nursing work force?" and "Please identify your top three dis-satisfiers in nursing and solutions for making improvements to each area." Due to the magnitude of the response, 2000 of the returned surveys were screened according to specific selection criteria resulting in qualitative analysis of 798 surveys. Methods: Data were examined using content analysis (Ryan & Bernard, 2000). This involved a line by line examination of each narrative response, making a judgment about its meaning and applying a code that represented its essence. Management of large amounts of text and codes was achieved through Atlas.ti., sophisticated, state-of-the-art qualitative analysis software. Results: The analysis produced 3,970 quotations and 254 codes. Codes were distilled to 18 "conceptual" codes and divided into 3 categories ("Dis-satisfiers", "Solutions", "Return to Work"): Dis-satisfier Codes: Compensation and Benefits, Education, Employer Practices, Issues in the Profession, Relationships, Staffing and Care Delivery, Workload and Stress; Solution Codes: Education, External Controls, Financial Incentives, Internal Controls, Management Behavior, Streamlining Work; Return to Work Codes: Implacable Barriers, Care Delivery Mechanism, Education/Retraining, Employment Issues and Work Environment. A surprising feature of the analysis was the prominence of compensation and benefits as the number one dis-satisfier for this sample of nurses. Implications: Results from this study suggest a high degree of dissatisfaction with salary and benefits that supersedes all other factors (including work environment issues), a finding that has been previously unreported in the literature and is counter to common beliefs. Periodic sampling of a state's nursing population by its board of nursing about issues important to its nurses can provide a perspective that is unavailable through any other venue.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMultiple Approaches to Assessing the Nursing Work Environment: The Arizona Nursing Workforce Survey: A Qualitative Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158183-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Multiple Approaches to Assessing the Nursing Work Environment: The Arizona Nursing Workforce Survey: A Qualitative Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hrabe, David, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">David.Hrabe@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Study Aims: The study aims were to: (1) identify factors which would motivate nurses who have left nursing to return to work in healthcare and (2) describe dis-satisfiers and proposed solutions by practicing nurses. Background: The Arizona State Board of Nursing commissioned a pilot study to examine nursing workforce trends and needs of Arizona's nurses. The survey collected demographic data, information about current employment, plans to continue working in nursing and opinions about a number of variables (e.g. work intensity, adequacy of staffing, compensation). Over 12,000 surveys were returned; analysis of quantitative variables is incomplete. This report focuses on narrative responses to two items: &quot;If you are not employed in nursing, what would it take to get you to return to the nursing work force?&quot; and &quot;Please identify your top three dis-satisfiers in nursing and solutions for making improvements to each area.&quot; Due to the magnitude of the response, 2000 of the returned surveys were screened according to specific selection criteria resulting in qualitative analysis of 798 surveys. Methods: Data were examined using content analysis (Ryan &amp; Bernard, 2000). This involved a line by line examination of each narrative response, making a judgment about its meaning and applying a code that represented its essence. Management of large amounts of text and codes was achieved through Atlas.ti., sophisticated, state-of-the-art qualitative analysis software. Results: The analysis produced 3,970 quotations and 254 codes. Codes were distilled to 18 &quot;conceptual&quot; codes and divided into 3 categories (&quot;Dis-satisfiers&quot;, &quot;Solutions&quot;, &quot;Return to Work&quot;): Dis-satisfier Codes: Compensation and Benefits, Education, Employer Practices, Issues in the Profession, Relationships, Staffing and Care Delivery, Workload and Stress; Solution Codes: Education, External Controls, Financial Incentives, Internal Controls, Management Behavior, Streamlining Work; Return to Work Codes: Implacable Barriers, Care Delivery Mechanism, Education/Retraining, Employment Issues and Work Environment. A surprising feature of the analysis was the prominence of compensation and benefits as the number one dis-satisfier for this sample of nurses. Implications: Results from this study suggest a high degree of dissatisfaction with salary and benefits that supersedes all other factors (including work environment issues), a finding that has been previously unreported in the literature and is counter to common beliefs. Periodic sampling of a state's nursing population by its board of nursing about issues important to its nurses can provide a perspective that is unavailable through any other venue.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:35:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:35:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.