2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158184
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effectiveness of Heart Health Intervention in Older Deaf
Abstract:
The Effectiveness of Heart Health Intervention in Older Deaf
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kang, Youngmi, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Doctoral Student
Co-Authors:Elaine G. Jones
Background: The importance of interventions to decrease modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) has gained more attention in recent years as CVD remains the leading cause of premature death in America. High level of self-efficacy for heart health behaviors is strongly related to enactment of health behaviors. However, older deaf adults have limited access to CVD related information due to barriers to spoken or written language. However, there have been few efforts to create accessible heart health interventions for older deaf adults. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of deaf heart health intervention (DHHI). The purpose of this presentation will be to describe the effectiveness of the DHHI in improving modifiable CVD risk factors among older deaf adults. Sample: A subsample of forty one subjects were over 50 years old and met study criteria that they had not been diagnosed with CVD. Study participants were recruited from Tucson (intervention group, n=14) and Phoenix (comparison group, n=27). The mean age was 67 years. Thirty eight (93%) of subjects were White/non-Hispanic, 19 (46%) were married. And the mean education level was 12 years. Methods: The design of this study is a quasi-experimental and repeated measure (pre and post). The DHHI is conducted over eight weeks, two hours/week of classroom activities with additional home assignments. The curriculum of the DHHI includes information about CVD, heart healthy nutrition, exercise, and stress management. The research questions were: what is the difference between intervention and comparison group on 1) self-efficacy 2) perceived stress and 3) nutrition knowledge at completion of the DHHI?. Instruments: the self-rated abilities scale for health practices (Stuifbergen & Becker, 1994), perceived stress scale (Cohen, 1994), and general nutrition knowledge scale (Parmeter & Wardle, 1999). All instruments were translated into sign language on videotape. Data analysis: descriptive statistics, chi-square, t-test, and 2 (intervention vs. comparison) x 2 (testing period) repeated measures ANOVA were used. Results: Self Efficacy: The mean scores of self-efficacy decreased from pretest (M=85.4, SD=13.7) to posttest (M=81.1, SD=11.6) for the comparison group while these scores increased dramatically for the intervention group from pretest (M=73.7, SD=15.9) to posttest (M=80.8, SD=11.9). Perceived Stress: The mean scores of perceived stress decreased from 19.3 (SD=8.0) to 18.9 (SD=6.2) in the intervention group but the change was not statistically significant. Nutrition: The mean scores of nutrition knowledge remained relatively stable from pretest (M=40.9, SD=9.9) to posttest (M=40.8, SD=12.8) for the comparison group. However, the scores for the intervention group increased dramatically from pretest (M=37.2, SD=10.5) to posttest (M=41.1, SD=8.1). Conclusion: This study indicates that, although older deaf have low levels of self-efficacy and nutrition knowledge for heart health behaviors compared to other general populations, the heart health intervention was effective in increasing their self-efficacy and nutrition knowledge, and there was a trend toward decreases in perceived stress.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effectiveness of Heart Health Intervention in Older Deafen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158184-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effectiveness of Heart Health Intervention in Older Deaf</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kang, Youngmi, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ykang@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elaine G. Jones</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The importance of interventions to decrease modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) has gained more attention in recent years as CVD remains the leading cause of premature death in America. High level of self-efficacy for heart health behaviors is strongly related to enactment of health behaviors. However, older deaf adults have limited access to CVD related information due to barriers to spoken or written language. However, there have been few efforts to create accessible heart health interventions for older deaf adults. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of deaf heart health intervention (DHHI). The purpose of this presentation will be to describe the effectiveness of the DHHI in improving modifiable CVD risk factors among older deaf adults. Sample: A subsample of forty one subjects were over 50 years old and met study criteria that they had not been diagnosed with CVD. Study participants were recruited from Tucson (intervention group, n=14) and Phoenix (comparison group, n=27). The mean age was 67 years. Thirty eight (93%) of subjects were White/non-Hispanic, 19 (46%) were married. And the mean education level was 12 years. Methods: The design of this study is a quasi-experimental and repeated measure (pre and post). The DHHI is conducted over eight weeks, two hours/week of classroom activities with additional home assignments. The curriculum of the DHHI includes information about CVD, heart healthy nutrition, exercise, and stress management. The research questions were: what is the difference between intervention and comparison group on 1) self-efficacy 2) perceived stress and 3) nutrition knowledge at completion of the DHHI?. Instruments: the self-rated abilities scale for health practices (Stuifbergen &amp; Becker, 1994), perceived stress scale (Cohen, 1994), and general nutrition knowledge scale (Parmeter &amp; Wardle, 1999). All instruments were translated into sign language on videotape. Data analysis: descriptive statistics, chi-square, t-test, and 2 (intervention vs. comparison) x 2 (testing period) repeated measures ANOVA were used. Results: Self Efficacy: The mean scores of self-efficacy decreased from pretest (M=85.4, SD=13.7) to posttest (M=81.1, SD=11.6) for the comparison group while these scores increased dramatically for the intervention group from pretest (M=73.7, SD=15.9) to posttest (M=80.8, SD=11.9). Perceived Stress: The mean scores of perceived stress decreased from 19.3 (SD=8.0) to 18.9 (SD=6.2) in the intervention group but the change was not statistically significant. Nutrition: The mean scores of nutrition knowledge remained relatively stable from pretest (M=40.9, SD=9.9) to posttest (M=40.8, SD=12.8) for the comparison group. However, the scores for the intervention group increased dramatically from pretest (M=37.2, SD=10.5) to posttest (M=41.1, SD=8.1). Conclusion: This study indicates that, although older deaf have low levels of self-efficacy and nutrition knowledge for heart health behaviors compared to other general populations, the heart health intervention was effective in increasing their self-efficacy and nutrition knowledge, and there was a trend toward decreases in perceived stress.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:35:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:35:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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