2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158185
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Practitioner Transition to Prescribing Schedule II-IV Drugs
Abstract:
Nurse Practitioner Transition to Prescribing Schedule II-IV Drugs
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kaplan, Louise, PhD, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Marie-Annette Brown
Purpose: This study describes the process of transition that Nurse Practitioners (NPs) experience when the law changes to allow a broader scope of practice. Rationale: Only 60% of Washington State NPs have obtained schedule II-IV prescriptive authority since it became legal to do so in 2001. Nursing organizations actively involved in the passage of the law anticipated that most NPs would seize the opportunity to prescribe controlled substances. Prior studies in our program of research identified internal and external barriers to obtaining this authority. These findings pointed to the need for an explanatory model of NPs experiences with the process of transition to prescribing controlled substances. Methods: This longitudinal study used qualitative methodology with grounded theory approaches to explore Washington State NPs' transition to prescribing schedule II-IV drugs. We conducted twelve focus groups with nearly 100 NPs including those with and without schedule II-IV prescriptive authority. Results: Data analysis led to a conceptualization of the process of transition for NPs dealing with a scope of practice change. The non-linear transition process includes three dimensions: Resisting Change, Ambivalence About Change and Embracing Change. Some NPs experienced two or three of these dimensions while others were firmly fixed in one. NPs in each of these dimensions were situated in various perceptions of the change. For example, those NPs who were Resisting Change expressed sentiments such as: Why change?--"The status quo works." NPs who were Ambivalent About Change described rationale such as: The fear factor--"Will I jeopardize my license?" Study participants who were Embracing Change lauded their new scope of practice with comments such as: Becoming Legitimate--"Finally I have both the responsibility AND the authority." Our analysis also revealed different views of autonomy among study participants that were not determined by whether or not a NP had schedule II-IV authority nor by which of the three dimensions the NP was situated in. Implications: Our results indicate that there is a need to develop innovative strategies to motivate NPs to adopt a less restrictive scope of practice. Any scope of practice barrier, no matter how small, diminishes the nursing profession's autonomy. Scope of practice barriers also limit access to comprehensive care for millions of patients nationwide.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Practitioner Transition to Prescribing Schedule II-IV Drugsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158185-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurse Practitioner Transition to Prescribing Schedule II-IV Drugs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kaplan, Louise, PhD, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kaplanla@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marie-Annette Brown</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study describes the process of transition that Nurse Practitioners (NPs) experience when the law changes to allow a broader scope of practice. Rationale: Only 60% of Washington State NPs have obtained schedule II-IV prescriptive authority since it became legal to do so in 2001. Nursing organizations actively involved in the passage of the law anticipated that most NPs would seize the opportunity to prescribe controlled substances. Prior studies in our program of research identified internal and external barriers to obtaining this authority. These findings pointed to the need for an explanatory model of NPs experiences with the process of transition to prescribing controlled substances. Methods: This longitudinal study used qualitative methodology with grounded theory approaches to explore Washington State NPs' transition to prescribing schedule II-IV drugs. We conducted twelve focus groups with nearly 100 NPs including those with and without schedule II-IV prescriptive authority. Results: Data analysis led to a conceptualization of the process of transition for NPs dealing with a scope of practice change. The non-linear transition process includes three dimensions: Resisting Change, Ambivalence About Change and Embracing Change. Some NPs experienced two or three of these dimensions while others were firmly fixed in one. NPs in each of these dimensions were situated in various perceptions of the change. For example, those NPs who were Resisting Change expressed sentiments such as: Why change?--&quot;The status quo works.&quot; NPs who were Ambivalent About Change described rationale such as: The fear factor--&quot;Will I jeopardize my license?&quot; Study participants who were Embracing Change lauded their new scope of practice with comments such as: Becoming Legitimate--&quot;Finally I have both the responsibility AND the authority.&quot; Our analysis also revealed different views of autonomy among study participants that were not determined by whether or not a NP had schedule II-IV authority nor by which of the three dimensions the NP was situated in. Implications: Our results indicate that there is a need to develop innovative strategies to motivate NPs to adopt a less restrictive scope of practice. Any scope of practice barrier, no matter how small, diminishes the nursing profession's autonomy. Scope of practice barriers also limit access to comprehensive care for millions of patients nationwide.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:35:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:35:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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