2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158186
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reducing Health Disparities in Minority Populations
Abstract:
Reducing Health Disparities in Minority Populations
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle, DrPH
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii at Manoa
Title:Assistant Professor
Purpose: The goals of this study were (1) to describe and determine the relationship between caregiving role (occupancy, involvement, and integration) and acculturation and perceived health status (2) to test the direct and moderating effects of acculturation and caregiving role (occupancy, involvement, and integration) on perceived health status. Hypotheses: (1) Filipino American grandparent caregiving role integration will be a significant positive predictor of perceived health status and (2) Acculturation will have a direct and moderating effect in the relationship between Filipino American grandparent caregiving role integration on perceived health status. Background: In this study, caregiver role includes role occupancy, role involvement, and role integration. Role integration is the difference between role satisfaction and role stress to caregiving and other roles of the caregiver. Previous research has suggested that the role integration is related to perceived health status more than role occupancy or role involve-ment and that the greater degree of role integration, the higher the perceived health. There are no empirical studies that address caregiver role and perceived health of grandparents caring for their grandchildren. Of particular interest is the direct and moderating effect of acculturation on grandparent caregiver role and perceive health status. Methods: Data were gathered from 50 Filipino American grandparents who cared for their grandchildren on a full-time basis (which averaged around 48.5 ¦ 26.4 hours per week and 4.9 ¦ 4.5 years.) These grandparents were born in the Philippines, immigrated to the U.S., and were able to speak and converse in both English and Ilokano. The average length of residence in the US was 23.3 ¦ 19.2 years. The majority of grandparents were grandmothers than grandfathers (9:1), married, working 6.7 hours a week, living with their adult children (48%) or in their own house with the adult children (40%). These grandparents were Catholic, with an average household income of $40,000 - $49,999 (SD=2.2) and a majority had an elementary, some high school/high school education, or college degree. The people living in each household were 5.5 ¦ 2.3. The grandchildren were born in the US. The average number of grandchildren cared for was two and the average age of the children were five to six years of age. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation and linear regression which included educational level and acculturation as other independent variables. The three most commonly subject selected roles for this study were mother/father, grandparent, and caregiver. Results: Hypothesis 1 was supported; role integration was a positive predictor of perceived health status. Hypothesis 2 was not supported; acculturation did not have either a direct or moderating effect on the relationship between role integration and perceived health status. Role satisfaction also was a positive predictor of perceived health status. However, role stress, role occupancy, and role involvement were not significantly associated with perceived health status in this sample. Implication: Caregiver role integration needs to be considered as a predictor of perceived health status in Filipino American grandparent caregivers of grandchildren. Providing support that increases role satisfaction may be more helpful than reducing the number of roles or the extent of involvement. Acculturation may not play as influential a role as caregivers' perception of their role integration and role satisfaction to their perceived health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReducing Health Disparities in Minority Populationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158186-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reducing Health Disparities in Minority Populations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle, DrPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii at Manoa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">merle@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The goals of this study were (1) to describe and determine the relationship between caregiving role (occupancy, involvement, and integration) and acculturation and perceived health status (2) to test the direct and moderating effects of acculturation and caregiving role (occupancy, involvement, and integration) on perceived health status. Hypotheses: (1) Filipino American grandparent caregiving role integration will be a significant positive predictor of perceived health status and (2) Acculturation will have a direct and moderating effect in the relationship between Filipino American grandparent caregiving role integration on perceived health status. Background: In this study, caregiver role includes role occupancy, role involvement, and role integration. Role integration is the difference between role satisfaction and role stress to caregiving and other roles of the caregiver. Previous research has suggested that the role integration is related to perceived health status more than role occupancy or role involve-ment and that the greater degree of role integration, the higher the perceived health. There are no empirical studies that address caregiver role and perceived health of grandparents caring for their grandchildren. Of particular interest is the direct and moderating effect of acculturation on grandparent caregiver role and perceive health status. Methods: Data were gathered from 50 Filipino American grandparents who cared for their grandchildren on a full-time basis (which averaged around 48.5 &brvbar; 26.4 hours per week and 4.9 &brvbar; 4.5 years.) These grandparents were born in the Philippines, immigrated to the U.S., and were able to speak and converse in both English and Ilokano. The average length of residence in the US was 23.3 &brvbar; 19.2 years. The majority of grandparents were grandmothers than grandfathers (9:1), married, working 6.7 hours a week, living with their adult children (48%) or in their own house with the adult children (40%). These grandparents were Catholic, with an average household income of $40,000 - $49,999 (SD=2.2) and a majority had an elementary, some high school/high school education, or college degree. The people living in each household were 5.5 &brvbar; 2.3. The grandchildren were born in the US. The average number of grandchildren cared for was two and the average age of the children were five to six years of age. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation and linear regression which included educational level and acculturation as other independent variables. The three most commonly subject selected roles for this study were mother/father, grandparent, and caregiver. Results: Hypothesis 1 was supported; role integration was a positive predictor of perceived health status. Hypothesis 2 was not supported; acculturation did not have either a direct or moderating effect on the relationship between role integration and perceived health status. Role satisfaction also was a positive predictor of perceived health status. However, role stress, role occupancy, and role involvement were not significantly associated with perceived health status in this sample. Implication: Caregiver role integration needs to be considered as a predictor of perceived health status in Filipino American grandparent caregivers of grandchildren. Providing support that increases role satisfaction may be more helpful than reducing the number of roles or the extent of involvement. Acculturation may not play as influential a role as caregivers' perception of their role integration and role satisfaction to their perceived health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:35:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:35:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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