2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158187
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Worry and Knowledge are Moderators Between Experiences and Perceived Risk
Abstract:
Worry and Knowledge are Moderators Between Experiences and Perceived Risk
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Katapodi, Maria, RN, MS, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
Title:Project Director
Co-Authors:Marylin J. Dodd, Kathryn A. Lee, Janice C. Humphreys, Bruce Cooper, Noreen C. Facione
Background: Although having a family history of breast cancer, worry, and abnormal breast symptoms are related to a heightened perception of risk (Katapodi et al., 2004), it is not clear why some women underestimate their risk in the presence of a family history, and how experiences with affected family members, affected friends, and breast symptoms influence perceived risk. Purpose: To 1) examine whether experiences with affected family members, affected friends, and abnormal breast symptoms influence perceived risk, and 2) whether worry and knowledge of breast cancer risk factors moderate the relationships between experiences and perceived risk. Sample: We recruited 184 women from community settings between the ages of 30 and 85 (Mean Age: 46¦12, 43% White, 26% Black, 14% Hispanic, 17% Asian). Women agreed to complete a survey in English and have never been diagnosed with any type of cancer. Methods: Family history of breast cancer and number of affected friends was based on self-report. We used four indicators of experiences with abnormal breast symptoms, namely reason for the most recent mammogram, reason for the most recent clinical breast exam, number of breast biopsies, and current symptoms. We assessed breast cancer worry with a 4-scale instrument (Cronbach's alpha 0.85), and knowledge of breast cancer risk factors with a 13-item index (Cronbach's alpha 0.80). We measured perceived breast cancer risk by performing a Principal Component Analysis of three, one-item scales (verbal, comparative, and numerical) that measured perceived risk (Cronbach's alpha 0.70). Results: Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that having an affected family member, affected friends, and abnormal breast symptoms predicted an increase in perceived risk and accounted for 6%, 2%, and 5% of the variance in perceived risk respectively (p<.05). Worry accounted for 7% and the interaction of worry with knowledge of risk factors accounted for an additional 5% of the variance in perceived risk (p<.05). Worry and knowledge of breast cancer risk factors moderated the relationships between experiences and perceived risk. Conclusions: We discuss possible cognitive mechanisms with which experiences, worry, and knowledge influence perceived breast cancer risk. Interventions should increase knowledge about risk factors and consider worry and cognitive mechanisms of information processing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorry and Knowledge are Moderators Between Experiences and Perceived Risken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158187-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Worry and Knowledge are Moderators Between Experiences and Perceived Risk</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Katapodi, Maria, RN, MS, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Project Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maria.katapodi@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marylin J. Dodd, Kathryn A. Lee, Janice C. Humphreys, Bruce Cooper, Noreen C. Facione</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Although having a family history of breast cancer, worry, and abnormal breast symptoms are related to a heightened perception of risk (Katapodi et al., 2004), it is not clear why some women underestimate their risk in the presence of a family history, and how experiences with affected family members, affected friends, and breast symptoms influence perceived risk. Purpose: To 1) examine whether experiences with affected family members, affected friends, and abnormal breast symptoms influence perceived risk, and 2) whether worry and knowledge of breast cancer risk factors moderate the relationships between experiences and perceived risk. Sample: We recruited 184 women from community settings between the ages of 30 and 85 (Mean Age: 46&brvbar;12, 43% White, 26% Black, 14% Hispanic, 17% Asian). Women agreed to complete a survey in English and have never been diagnosed with any type of cancer. Methods: Family history of breast cancer and number of affected friends was based on self-report. We used four indicators of experiences with abnormal breast symptoms, namely reason for the most recent mammogram, reason for the most recent clinical breast exam, number of breast biopsies, and current symptoms. We assessed breast cancer worry with a 4-scale instrument (Cronbach's alpha 0.85), and knowledge of breast cancer risk factors with a 13-item index (Cronbach's alpha 0.80). We measured perceived breast cancer risk by performing a Principal Component Analysis of three, one-item scales (verbal, comparative, and numerical) that measured perceived risk (Cronbach's alpha 0.70). Results: Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that having an affected family member, affected friends, and abnormal breast symptoms predicted an increase in perceived risk and accounted for 6%, 2%, and 5% of the variance in perceived risk respectively (p&lt;.05). Worry accounted for 7% and the interaction of worry with knowledge of risk factors accounted for an additional 5% of the variance in perceived risk (p&lt;.05). Worry and knowledge of breast cancer risk factors moderated the relationships between experiences and perceived risk. Conclusions: We discuss possible cognitive mechanisms with which experiences, worry, and knowledge influence perceived breast cancer risk. Interventions should increase knowledge about risk factors and consider worry and cognitive mechanisms of information processing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:35:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:35:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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