Predictors of Perceived Breast Cancer Risk and Screening Behavior: Meta-Analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158188
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Perceived Breast Cancer Risk and Screening Behavior: Meta-Analysis
Abstract:
Predictors of Perceived Breast Cancer Risk and Screening Behavior: Meta-Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Katapodi, Maria, RN, MS, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California - San Francisco
Title:Project Director
Co-Authors:Marylin J. Dodd, Kathryn A. Lee, Noreen C. Facione
Background: Perceived risk is a principal variable in theoretical models that attempt to predict the adoption of health-protective behaviors. Methods: This meta-analysis synthesizes findings from 42 studies, identified in PubMed and PsycInfo from 1985 onward. Studies examined demographic and psychological variables as predictors of perceived breast cancer risk and the relationship between perceived risk and breast cancer screening. Statistical relationships, weighted for sample size, were transformed to effect sizes and 95% CIs. Results: Women do not have accurate perceptions of their breast cancer risk (N= 5,561, g=1.10). Overall they have an optimistic bias about their personal risk (g=0.99). However, having a positive family history (N= 70,660, g=0.88), recruitment site, and measurement error confounded these results. Perceived risk is not weakly influenced by age (N=38,000, g=0.13) and education (N=1,979, g=0.16), and was moderately affected by race/culture (N=2,192, g=0.38) and worry (N=6,090, g=0.49). There is an association between perceived risk and mammography screening (N=52,766, g=0.19). It is not clear whether perceived risk influences adherence to breast self-examination. Women who perceived a higher breast cancer risk were more likely to pursue genetic testing or undergo prophylactic mastectomy. Conclusion: Perceived breast cancer risk depends on psychological and cognitive variables and influences adherence to mammography screening guidelines.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Perceived Breast Cancer Risk and Screening Behavior: Meta-Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158188-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Perceived Breast Cancer Risk and Screening Behavior: Meta-Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Katapodi, Maria, RN, MS, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California - San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Project Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maria.katapodi@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marylin J. Dodd, Kathryn A. Lee, Noreen C. Facione</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Perceived risk is a principal variable in theoretical models that attempt to predict the adoption of health-protective behaviors. Methods: This meta-analysis synthesizes findings from 42 studies, identified in PubMed and PsycInfo from 1985 onward. Studies examined demographic and psychological variables as predictors of perceived breast cancer risk and the relationship between perceived risk and breast cancer screening. Statistical relationships, weighted for sample size, were transformed to effect sizes and 95% CIs. Results: Women do not have accurate perceptions of their breast cancer risk (N= 5,561, g=1.10). Overall they have an optimistic bias about their personal risk (g=0.99). However, having a positive family history (N= 70,660, g=0.88), recruitment site, and measurement error confounded these results. Perceived risk is not weakly influenced by age (N=38,000, g=0.13) and education (N=1,979, g=0.16), and was moderately affected by race/culture (N=2,192, g=0.38) and worry (N=6,090, g=0.49). There is an association between perceived risk and mammography screening (N=52,766, g=0.19). It is not clear whether perceived risk influences adherence to breast self-examination. Women who perceived a higher breast cancer risk were more likely to pursue genetic testing or undergo prophylactic mastectomy. Conclusion: Perceived breast cancer risk depends on psychological and cognitive variables and influences adherence to mammography screening guidelines.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:35:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:35:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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