2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158189
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community Knowledge of Sporadic and Genetic Breast Cancer Risk Factors
Abstract:
Community Knowledge of Sporadic and Genetic Breast Cancer Risk Factors
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Katapodi, Maria, RN, MS, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California - San Francisco
Title:Project Director
Co-Authors:Bradley A. Aouizerat
Background: It is not clear to what extent information aiming to raise awareness regarding breast cancer risk factors has been successfully integrated into women's perceptions. In light of the rapid evolution in cancer genetics it is important to track changes in knowledge regarding breast cancer risk factors so that health educators can incorporate findings into future planning. Purpose: 1) to describe knowledge of hereditary/familial and sporadic breast cancer risk factors among women in the community, and 2) to identify factors associated with knowledge of these risk factors. Sample: We recruited 184 women, who have never been diagnosed with cancer, were between 30 and 85 years old (X=46(12), and agreed to complete a questionnaire in English. Participants were from diverse racial/cultural backgrounds (43% European-descent, 26% African-descent, 17% Asian-descent, and 14% Hispanic). Most (49%) were college graduates and had a median annual family income $30,000 to $40,000. Methods: Cross-sectional survey in community settings around the San Francisco Bay Area. We assessed knowledge of hereditary/familial and sporadic breast cancer risk factors with a 13-item index (Cronbach's alpha 0.80). Findings: Although most women recognized the role of heredity as a risk factor, some did not understand the impact of paternal family history on one's risk. Some women did not recognize the relation between breast and ovarian cancer, risk factors associated with the Gail model, and that getting older increases one's risk. Level of education was the most important factor associated with knowledge of risk factors. Conclusions: Although age and family history are independent predictors of sporadic and hereditary/familial breast cancer risk, women in the community cannot distinguish between the two forms of the disease. Although this was a sample of educated women, their knowledge of breast cancer risk factors appeared incomplete. Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs) should provide individualized risk assessment and education regarding breast cancer risk factors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity Knowledge of Sporadic and Genetic Breast Cancer Risk Factorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158189-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Community Knowledge of Sporadic and Genetic Breast Cancer Risk Factors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Katapodi, Maria, RN, MS, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California - San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Project Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maria.katapodi@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bradley A. Aouizerat</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: It is not clear to what extent information aiming to raise awareness regarding breast cancer risk factors has been successfully integrated into women's perceptions. In light of the rapid evolution in cancer genetics it is important to track changes in knowledge regarding breast cancer risk factors so that health educators can incorporate findings into future planning. Purpose: 1) to describe knowledge of hereditary/familial and sporadic breast cancer risk factors among women in the community, and 2) to identify factors associated with knowledge of these risk factors. Sample: We recruited 184 women, who have never been diagnosed with cancer, were between 30 and 85 years old (X=46(12), and agreed to complete a questionnaire in English. Participants were from diverse racial/cultural backgrounds (43% European-descent, 26% African-descent, 17% Asian-descent, and 14% Hispanic). Most (49%) were college graduates and had a median annual family income $30,000 to $40,000. Methods: Cross-sectional survey in community settings around the San Francisco Bay Area. We assessed knowledge of hereditary/familial and sporadic breast cancer risk factors with a 13-item index (Cronbach's alpha 0.80). Findings: Although most women recognized the role of heredity as a risk factor, some did not understand the impact of paternal family history on one's risk. Some women did not recognize the relation between breast and ovarian cancer, risk factors associated with the Gail model, and that getting older increases one's risk. Level of education was the most important factor associated with knowledge of risk factors. Conclusions: Although age and family history are independent predictors of sporadic and hereditary/familial breast cancer risk, women in the community cannot distinguish between the two forms of the disease. Although this was a sample of educated women, their knowledge of breast cancer risk factors appeared incomplete. Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs) should provide individualized risk assessment and education regarding breast cancer risk factors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:35:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:35:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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