2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158190
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do Women Have an Accurate Perception of Their Breast Cancer Risk?
Abstract:
Do Women Have an Accurate Perception of Their Breast Cancer Risk?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Katapodi, Maria, RN, MS, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California - San Francisco
Title:Project Director
Co-Authors:Marylin J. Dodd, Kathryn A. Lee, Bruce Cooper, Noreen C. Facione
Background: Perceived risk affects health-protective behaviors. Findings of a meta-analysis are not clear as to whether women believe their breast cancer risk to be high or low. Purpose: To 1) describe perceived breast cancer risk, 2) examine consistency of responses across different risk measures, 3) examine the influence of demographic characteristics on perceived risk, 4) compare subjective and objective risk estimates, and 5) examine the influence of perceived risk on breast cancer screening behavior. Methods: The survey used three probability scales and the Gail model to measure perceived risk and objective risk in a multicultural sample of 184 women recruited from community settings. Results: Participants believed that their breast cancer risk was lower than average and rated the risk for friends/peers higher than their own (Optimistic Bias, p<0.01). Women with one affected first-degree relative did not perceive their risk to be higher than women with no family history. Older women perceived less than average risk (p<0.01). Verbal and Comparative risk ratings were most consistent. Numerical risk ratings were influenced by education, income, and race/culture (p<0.01). Participants underestimated their actual risk (p<0.01). Women who perceived higher risk were more likely to pursue a clinical breast exam for the evaluation of a breast problem. Conclusions: We demonstrated optimistic bias regarding perceived breast cancer risk in three different ways. Comparative and Verbal risk scales better reflect perceived risk than Numerical scales. Perceived risk did not influence behavior related to screening mammography and breast self exam, but influenced obtaining a clinical breast exam for the evaluation of an abnormal breast symptom. Educational interventions should focus on older women and those with one affected first-degree relative.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo Women Have an Accurate Perception of Their Breast Cancer Risk?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158190-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Do Women Have an Accurate Perception of Their Breast Cancer Risk?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Katapodi, Maria, RN, MS, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California - San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Project Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maria.katapodi@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marylin J. Dodd, Kathryn A. Lee, Bruce Cooper, Noreen C. Facione</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Perceived risk affects health-protective behaviors. Findings of a meta-analysis are not clear as to whether women believe their breast cancer risk to be high or low. Purpose: To 1) describe perceived breast cancer risk, 2) examine consistency of responses across different risk measures, 3) examine the influence of demographic characteristics on perceived risk, 4) compare subjective and objective risk estimates, and 5) examine the influence of perceived risk on breast cancer screening behavior. Methods: The survey used three probability scales and the Gail model to measure perceived risk and objective risk in a multicultural sample of 184 women recruited from community settings. Results: Participants believed that their breast cancer risk was lower than average and rated the risk for friends/peers higher than their own (Optimistic Bias, p&lt;0.01). Women with one affected first-degree relative did not perceive their risk to be higher than women with no family history. Older women perceived less than average risk (p&lt;0.01). Verbal and Comparative risk ratings were most consistent. Numerical risk ratings were influenced by education, income, and race/culture (p&lt;0.01). Participants underestimated their actual risk (p&lt;0.01). Women who perceived higher risk were more likely to pursue a clinical breast exam for the evaluation of a breast problem. Conclusions: We demonstrated optimistic bias regarding perceived breast cancer risk in three different ways. Comparative and Verbal risk scales better reflect perceived risk than Numerical scales. Perceived risk did not influence behavior related to screening mammography and breast self exam, but influenced obtaining a clinical breast exam for the evaluation of an abnormal breast symptom. Educational interventions should focus on older women and those with one affected first-degree relative.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:35:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:35:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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