2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158191
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived Breast Cancer Risk: Heuristic Reasoning and Dominance Structure
Abstract:
Perceived Breast Cancer Risk: Heuristic Reasoning and Dominance Structure
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Katapodi, Maria, RN, MS, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California - San Francisco
Title:Project Director
Co-Authors:Noreen C. Facione
Background: Studies suggest that people construct their risk perceptions by using inferential rules called heuristics. Heuristics represent logical shortcuts of the information-processing cognitive mechanisms, and are more likely to be used under conditions of uncertainty. So far, heuristics have been identified in studies that used a quantitative design. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine whether we could identify specific heuristics that influence perceived breast cancer risk in narrative data. Sample: We examined 11 interviews from women of diverse ethnic/cultural backgrounds that were recruited from community settings in the San Francisco Bay Area, agreed to provide an interview in English, and have never been diagnosed with any type of cancer. Method: Narratives in which women elaborated about their own breast cancer risk were analyzed with Argument and Heuristic Reasoning Analysis methodology, which is based on applied logic. Findings: Our findings uncover the cognitive processes that women use to construct breast cancer risk perception. The availability, simulation, representativeness, affect, and perceived control heuristics, and the search for a dominance structure were commonly used for making risk assessments. Themes underlying these assessments included experiences with an abnormal breast symptom, experiences with affected family and friends, and beliefs about lifestyle, perceived control, and trust in health providers. Assessment of the potential threat of a breast symptom was facilitated by the search for a dominance structure. Experiences with family and friends were incorporated into risk assessments through the availability, simulation, representativeness, and affect heuristics. Mistrust in health providers led to an inappropriate dependence on the perceived control heuristic. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that different heuristics can be identified in interview data. These heuristics appear to create predictable biases and reveal that perceived breast cancer risk is based on common cognitive patterns.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived Breast Cancer Risk: Heuristic Reasoning and Dominance Structureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158191-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceived Breast Cancer Risk: Heuristic Reasoning and Dominance Structure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Katapodi, Maria, RN, MS, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California - San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Project Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maria.katapodi@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Noreen C. Facione</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Studies suggest that people construct their risk perceptions by using inferential rules called heuristics. Heuristics represent logical shortcuts of the information-processing cognitive mechanisms, and are more likely to be used under conditions of uncertainty. So far, heuristics have been identified in studies that used a quantitative design. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine whether we could identify specific heuristics that influence perceived breast cancer risk in narrative data. Sample: We examined 11 interviews from women of diverse ethnic/cultural backgrounds that were recruited from community settings in the San Francisco Bay Area, agreed to provide an interview in English, and have never been diagnosed with any type of cancer. Method: Narratives in which women elaborated about their own breast cancer risk were analyzed with Argument and Heuristic Reasoning Analysis methodology, which is based on applied logic. Findings: Our findings uncover the cognitive processes that women use to construct breast cancer risk perception. The availability, simulation, representativeness, affect, and perceived control heuristics, and the search for a dominance structure were commonly used for making risk assessments. Themes underlying these assessments included experiences with an abnormal breast symptom, experiences with affected family and friends, and beliefs about lifestyle, perceived control, and trust in health providers. Assessment of the potential threat of a breast symptom was facilitated by the search for a dominance structure. Experiences with family and friends were incorporated into risk assessments through the availability, simulation, representativeness, and affect heuristics. Mistrust in health providers led to an inappropriate dependence on the perceived control heuristic. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that different heuristics can be identified in interview data. These heuristics appear to create predictable biases and reveal that perceived breast cancer risk is based on common cognitive patterns.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:36:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:36:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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