Jordanian and Palestinian American Women's Participation in Breast Cancer Screening

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158192
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Jordanian and Palestinian American Women's Participation in Breast Cancer Screening
Abstract:
Jordanian and Palestinian American Women's Participation in Breast Cancer Screening
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kawar, Lina Najib, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Azusa Pacific University
Title:Assistant Professor
Purpose: Describes the relationship of psychological variables (affect, attitudes, and habits) and sociocultural factors (social norms, social influences, and acculturation) on breast cancer screening (BCS) participation among United States (US) resident Jordanian and/or Palestinian women (JPW). Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Studies identified that Arabs in general, including JPW, have different cultural practices that affect their behaviors toward health actions. In the US, although Arabs are considered Whites, according to 2000 census Arabs in general constitute a very small fraction only 0.29% of the total US population. However, use of BCS in groups other than main minority groups are understudied. The literature reveals that breast cancer (BC) morbidity and mortality is higher among minority groups. In the US, women of races and ethnicities other than White European descent are less likely to participate in BCS. In Israel, investigators compared Arab to Jewish women in regard to BC finding demographics and cultural differences. In Jordan, BC situation is vague on the contrary demographics and cultural differences are present. Delay and late presentation of BC is a major problem. Delay may be related to lack of screening, therefore this study was conducted among US Arab immigrants. A culturally sensitive model (The Model of Participation) was used to conduct this study. Methods: This predictive cross sectional correlational study took place in the Washington DC metropolitan area between September 2001 and January 2002 to determine if the psychological variables mediate the relationship between sociocultural factors and participation in BCS. This dissertation work used a convenience sample of 130 healthy JPW that were recruited using snowballing techniques. Each eligible woman was asked to complete a questionnaire including demographics, psychological variables measures, cultural variables measures, and to identify barriers to screening. Three modes of data collection were used including interviews, independent completion of the questionnaire, and telephone interviews. All 130 questionnaires were presented and gathered by the investigator in either language, Arabic or English. Translation and back translation of the introductory letter and questionnaire were conducted independently and were assured for cultural sensitivity. Results: Of the 130 participants, 56 identified themselves Jordanians and 74 Palestinians. Of the Jordanian women, 8 were born in other countries and returned to Jordan within few months after birth. Women's ages ranged from 20 to 80 years old. More than half of the participants were housewives and 71.5% were married. Of all the participants, 21.5% reported having a family history of BC. Most women had one immediate relative with BC, 2 had 2 relatives, 1 had 3 relatives, and 1 had 4 relatives. A single variable, habits, was found to mediate only one relationship between social influences and participation in BCS. Even though most of the mediating hypotheses were not supported and further testing was not pursed, quantitative and qualitative data offered support to the importance of cultural factors. Implications: Despite its limitations, this study explored some of the sociocultural factors, provided descriptions of knowledge, feelings, attitudes, habits, enabling factors, and explored barriers toward participation to BCS among US resident JPW. Findings confirm the need for culturally sensitive studies to understand diverse populations and develop programs of intervention specific to their situation. Data suggest the basis for future intervention research on BCS with unstudied group of immigrant Arab women. Findings provide valuable information to clinicians, educators, and researchers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleJordanian and Palestinian American Women's Participation in Breast Cancer Screeningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158192-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Jordanian and Palestinian American Women's Participation in Breast Cancer Screening</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kawar, Lina Najib, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Azusa Pacific University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lkawar@apu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Describes the relationship of psychological variables (affect, attitudes, and habits) and sociocultural factors (social norms, social influences, and acculturation) on breast cancer screening (BCS) participation among United States (US) resident Jordanian and/or Palestinian women (JPW). Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Studies identified that Arabs in general, including JPW, have different cultural practices that affect their behaviors toward health actions. In the US, although Arabs are considered Whites, according to 2000 census Arabs in general constitute a very small fraction only 0.29% of the total US population. However, use of BCS in groups other than main minority groups are understudied. The literature reveals that breast cancer (BC) morbidity and mortality is higher among minority groups. In the US, women of races and ethnicities other than White European descent are less likely to participate in BCS. In Israel, investigators compared Arab to Jewish women in regard to BC finding demographics and cultural differences. In Jordan, BC situation is vague on the contrary demographics and cultural differences are present. Delay and late presentation of BC is a major problem. Delay may be related to lack of screening, therefore this study was conducted among US Arab immigrants. A culturally sensitive model (The Model of Participation) was used to conduct this study. Methods: This predictive cross sectional correlational study took place in the Washington DC metropolitan area between September 2001 and January 2002 to determine if the psychological variables mediate the relationship between sociocultural factors and participation in BCS. This dissertation work used a convenience sample of 130 healthy JPW that were recruited using snowballing techniques. Each eligible woman was asked to complete a questionnaire including demographics, psychological variables measures, cultural variables measures, and to identify barriers to screening. Three modes of data collection were used including interviews, independent completion of the questionnaire, and telephone interviews. All 130 questionnaires were presented and gathered by the investigator in either language, Arabic or English. Translation and back translation of the introductory letter and questionnaire were conducted independently and were assured for cultural sensitivity. Results: Of the 130 participants, 56 identified themselves Jordanians and 74 Palestinians. Of the Jordanian women, 8 were born in other countries and returned to Jordan within few months after birth. Women's ages ranged from 20 to 80 years old. More than half of the participants were housewives and 71.5% were married. Of all the participants, 21.5% reported having a family history of BC. Most women had one immediate relative with BC, 2 had 2 relatives, 1 had 3 relatives, and 1 had 4 relatives. A single variable, habits, was found to mediate only one relationship between social influences and participation in BCS. Even though most of the mediating hypotheses were not supported and further testing was not pursed, quantitative and qualitative data offered support to the importance of cultural factors. Implications: Despite its limitations, this study explored some of the sociocultural factors, provided descriptions of knowledge, feelings, attitudes, habits, enabling factors, and explored barriers toward participation to BCS among US resident JPW. Findings confirm the need for culturally sensitive studies to understand diverse populations and develop programs of intervention specific to their situation. Data suggest the basis for future intervention research on BCS with unstudied group of immigrant Arab women. Findings provide valuable information to clinicians, educators, and researchers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:36:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:36:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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