2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158195
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Results of a Gender-Specific Intervention in the Juvenile Justice System
Abstract:
Results of a Gender-Specific Intervention in the Juvenile Justice System
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kelley, Patricia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Kansas City, School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Jane Dimmitt
Purpose/Aims: To determine the effect of a six-hour, gender-specific intervention among girls in the juvenile justice system (JJS). Background: Girls in the JJS have a high prevalence of sexual risk and dating violence risk behaviors that can have immediate and long-term consequences for adolescent girls, especially in communities with high rates of adolescent pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and/or HIV infection. Methods: We used a cyclic cohort study design, alternately presenting a six-hour, interactive, theory-based intervention using peer educators and a control curriculum presenting similar material in a lecture/video format. The population were girls from early offender and probation programs, the JJSs local mandated alternative school, and the detention and treatment facilities. Instruments assessed knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors related to sexual risk behaviors and dating violence. Results: The 591 girls who participated in the study had a mean age of 14.89 years (SD 1.24, range 11-18), 72.6% were of Hispanic background, 12% African-American, and 10.5% Caucasian, 59% were arrested more than once, and 17.8% were not attending school at the time of the study. The group had high rates of sexual risk behaviors and risk backgrounds, with strong correlations between childhood sexual abuse, multiple arrests, not attending school, and experiences with dating violence. Preliminary analysis of pre, immediately post, and six months post intervention found significant changes on three of the five scales across groups but minimal differences between the two groups. Implications: Despite the study design, there were differences in risk backgrounds between the intervention and control groups which may account for the lack of difference found between the intervention and study groups. From the perspective of a cost-benefit analysis, however, an appropriate video and lecture may be able to be widely replicated with girls in other JJS.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResults of a Gender-Specific Intervention in the Juvenile Justice Systemen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158195-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Results of a Gender-Specific Intervention in the Juvenile Justice System</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kelley, Patricia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Kansas City, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kellypj@umkc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jane Dimmitt</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: To determine the effect of a six-hour, gender-specific intervention among girls in the juvenile justice system (JJS). Background: Girls in the JJS have a high prevalence of sexual risk and dating violence risk behaviors that can have immediate and long-term consequences for adolescent girls, especially in communities with high rates of adolescent pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and/or HIV infection. Methods: We used a cyclic cohort study design, alternately presenting a six-hour, interactive, theory-based intervention using peer educators and a control curriculum presenting similar material in a lecture/video format. The population were girls from early offender and probation programs, the JJSs local mandated alternative school, and the detention and treatment facilities. Instruments assessed knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors related to sexual risk behaviors and dating violence. Results: The 591 girls who participated in the study had a mean age of 14.89 years (SD 1.24, range 11-18), 72.6% were of Hispanic background, 12% African-American, and 10.5% Caucasian, 59% were arrested more than once, and 17.8% were not attending school at the time of the study. The group had high rates of sexual risk behaviors and risk backgrounds, with strong correlations between childhood sexual abuse, multiple arrests, not attending school, and experiences with dating violence. Preliminary analysis of pre, immediately post, and six months post intervention found significant changes on three of the five scales across groups but minimal differences between the two groups. Implications: Despite the study design, there were differences in risk backgrounds between the intervention and control groups which may account for the lack of difference found between the intervention and study groups. From the perspective of a cost-benefit analysis, however, an appropriate video and lecture may be able to be widely replicated with girls in other JJS.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:36:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:36:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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