Reducing Health Disparities in Minority Populations: Korean American Maternal Parenting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158197
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reducing Health Disparities in Minority Populations: Korean American Maternal Parenting
Abstract:
Reducing Health Disparities in Minority Populations: Korean American Maternal Parenting
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kim, Eunjung, PhD, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington FCN Dept.
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Chin-Kang Koh
Purpose: The goals of this study were (1) to examine the relation between Korean American mothers' perception of acceptance-rejection and control and their children's social competence and (2) the role of maternal acculturation in the relation between maternal acceptance-rejection and control and children's social competence. Background: Social competence is children's ability to appropriately carry out their given roles and to accomplish their interpersonal goals in social settings. Previous research found that parenting was related to children's social competence. For Korean American children, the relation between parenting and children's social competence may differ based on parents' adaptation into American culture (i.e., acculturation). Methods: Self-report data were gathered from 53 Korean American mothers of children ages 3 to 9 in the Northwest. Mothers' were average 37 years old (SD = 4.33), had average 15 years (SD = 3.04) of education, and had lived in the US for average 10 years (SD = 6.26). Forty-nine percent of the families had annual income of more than $60,000. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation and multiple hierarchical regressions. Results: Maternal rejection was negatively related to children's social competence (F? (1, 51) = 9.27, ¯ = -.39, P < .01, R? = .15). Mothers' American orientation had a moderating effect between maternal acceptance-rejection and social competence (F? (1, 49) = 4.63, ¯ = 1.45, P< .05, R? = .07). When mothers scored low in American orientation, maternal rejection was negatively related to children's social competence; whereas when mothers scored high in American orientation, maternal rejection was not related to social competence. High maternal American orientation buffered children against the effect of maternal rejection. Implication: Maternal acculturation needs to be considered when one examines the relation between parenting and children's social competence. It also indicates the necessity of including a cultural component when one develops a parenting program for this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReducing Health Disparities in Minority Populations: Korean American Maternal Parentingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158197-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reducing Health Disparities in Minority Populations: Korean American Maternal Parenting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kim, Eunjung, PhD, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington FCN Dept.</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eunjungk@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Chin-Kang Koh</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The goals of this study were (1) to examine the relation between Korean American mothers' perception of acceptance-rejection and control and their children's social competence and (2) the role of maternal acculturation in the relation between maternal acceptance-rejection and control and children's social competence. Background: Social competence is children's ability to appropriately carry out their given roles and to accomplish their interpersonal goals in social settings. Previous research found that parenting was related to children's social competence. For Korean American children, the relation between parenting and children's social competence may differ based on parents' adaptation into American culture (i.e., acculturation). Methods: Self-report data were gathered from 53 Korean American mothers of children ages 3 to 9 in the Northwest. Mothers' were average 37 years old (SD = 4.33), had average 15 years (SD = 3.04) of education, and had lived in the US for average 10 years (SD = 6.26). Forty-nine percent of the families had annual income of more than $60,000. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation and multiple hierarchical regressions. Results: Maternal rejection was negatively related to children's social competence (F? (1, 51) = 9.27, &macr; = -.39, P &lt; .01, R? = .15). Mothers' American orientation had a moderating effect between maternal acceptance-rejection and social competence (F? (1, 49) = 4.63, &macr; = 1.45, P&lt; .05, R? = .07). When mothers scored low in American orientation, maternal rejection was negatively related to children's social competence; whereas when mothers scored high in American orientation, maternal rejection was not related to social competence. High maternal American orientation buffered children against the effect of maternal rejection. Implication: Maternal acculturation needs to be considered when one examines the relation between parenting and children's social competence. It also indicates the necessity of including a cultural component when one develops a parenting program for this population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:36:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:36:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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