Participatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: Exploring Cultural and Social Factors of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158198
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Participatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: Exploring Cultural and Social Factors of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer
Abstract:
Participatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: Exploring Cultural and Social Factors of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kim, Susie, RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Ewha Women's University College of Nursing Science
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:OkJa Lee, Joan Kathleen Magilvy, Mee Young Im, HaeOk Lee
Purpose: To explore and describe the social and cultural determinants of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) vaccination and knowledge of HBV infection, and health behavior among Korean Americans (KA). Background: The hepatitis B virus is 100 times more contagious than a human immunodeficiency virus. People chronically infected with Hepatitis B Virus not only have the potential for developing cirrhosis and primary hepatocellular carcinoma, but are also potential sources for infecting others. National and state-level data suggest that many Asian Pacific Islanders (APIs) are vulnerable to HBV infection and liver cancer, yet we know very little about the relative prevalence of HBV infection among these APIs or the social and cultural determinants of health behavior, and health burdens related to liver problems. Methods: A qualitative descriptive design informed by ethnography using key informant interviews was used and a purposive sampling technique was used to select key informants. Data were generated through interviews with 10 key Korean American informants from two Korean churches by two Korean-speaking researchers. Results: Qualitative analysis revealed that KAs wrongly believed that eating raw fish, sharing utensils, heavy alcohol consumption, and stress from an immigrants' life caused hepatitis B infection and liver problems. However, every participant was able to either recall friends or close relatives who suffered or died from liver problems. The most often emerged themes were, "I never thought about it", or "I am healthy now, so there is no reason for thinking about it". Regarding the HBV vaccination experience, participants did not differentiate HBV vaccine from other vaccinations and did not know HBV vaccinations should be received at three different times. The barriers to health care identified were language barriers including not speaking English, making an appointment in advance, and health costs and/or health insurance is too expensive in the U.S. Implications: This qualitative data allows the researchers to capture a phenomenon not previously identified in other infection literature. For instance, KAs strongly believed that sharing bowls and utensils, and drinking alcohol caused liver problems and HBV infection. All these factors are related to meals or Korean's eating culture and helped to better understand the varying ideas of HBV infection, liver cancer, and accompanying misunderstandings held by ethnic minority KAs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParticipatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: Exploring Cultural and Social Factors of HBV Vaccination and Liver Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158198-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Participatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: Exploring Cultural and Social Factors of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kim, Susie, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ewha Women's University College of Nursing Science</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susiekim@ewha.ac.kr</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">OkJa Lee, Joan Kathleen Magilvy, Mee Young Im, HaeOk Lee</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To explore and describe the social and cultural determinants of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) vaccination and knowledge of HBV infection, and health behavior among Korean Americans (KA). Background: The hepatitis B virus is 100 times more contagious than a human immunodeficiency virus. People chronically infected with Hepatitis B Virus not only have the potential for developing cirrhosis and primary hepatocellular carcinoma, but are also potential sources for infecting others. National and state-level data suggest that many Asian Pacific Islanders (APIs) are vulnerable to HBV infection and liver cancer, yet we know very little about the relative prevalence of HBV infection among these APIs or the social and cultural determinants of health behavior, and health burdens related to liver problems. Methods: A qualitative descriptive design informed by ethnography using key informant interviews was used and a purposive sampling technique was used to select key informants. Data were generated through interviews with 10 key Korean American informants from two Korean churches by two Korean-speaking researchers. Results: Qualitative analysis revealed that KAs wrongly believed that eating raw fish, sharing utensils, heavy alcohol consumption, and stress from an immigrants' life caused hepatitis B infection and liver problems. However, every participant was able to either recall friends or close relatives who suffered or died from liver problems. The most often emerged themes were, &quot;I never thought about it&quot;, or &quot;I am healthy now, so there is no reason for thinking about it&quot;. Regarding the HBV vaccination experience, participants did not differentiate HBV vaccine from other vaccinations and did not know HBV vaccinations should be received at three different times. The barriers to health care identified were language barriers including not speaking English, making an appointment in advance, and health costs and/or health insurance is too expensive in the U.S. Implications: This qualitative data allows the researchers to capture a phenomenon not previously identified in other infection literature. For instance, KAs strongly believed that sharing bowls and utensils, and drinking alcohol caused liver problems and HBV infection. All these factors are related to meals or Korean's eating culture and helped to better understand the varying ideas of HBV infection, liver cancer, and accompanying misunderstandings held by ethnic minority KAs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:36:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:36:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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