2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158201
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perception of problems for homecare patients with AIDS
Abstract:
Perception of problems for homecare patients with AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:1995
Author:Ortiz, Christine
P.I. Institution Name:University of California Departmentt of Mental Health
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:, San Francisco, CA, USA
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the perceived problems, physical status, and psychological support of patients with AIDS who are receiving home-based nursing care services.



Background: Early intervention in HIV disease and aggressive treatment strategies in the care of persons with AIDS have resulted in the prolonged survival of persons infected with HIV. Experts have suggested that HIV-infected individuals are living longer. Thus, the evolving chronicity of the disease is providing the impetus for the shift from inpatient care to out patient and home care treatment.



Methodology: This analysis is part of a longitudinal descriptive study examining the Quality of Nursing Care for People with AIDS in home and in-home hospice care. A convenience sample of 64 males with AIDS receiving homecare services were interviewed within the first week of admission to the Visiting Nurses and Hospice of San Francisco. Patients were asked the following: 1) identify three or four major problems; 2) describe how the nurse was helping to manage those problems; and to 3) rate their physical condition and psychological support on a scale from 1 to 10, where 1 = very poor and 10 = excellent.



Results: The sample was predominantly Caucasian with a mean age of 40.8 and sexual practice reported as the source of infection. Content analysis of patient reported problems varied from pain, fatigue, to depression. Patient reported nurses activities ranged from education to support type of activities. The mean score for physical condition was 5.04 (SD 1.93) and for psychological support was 8.08 (SD 2.22).



Implications and Significance: As the provision of homecare services for persons living with HIV/AIDS has continued to rise, it is imperative to examine the quality of nursing care of patients with AIDS receiving home based nursing care services. Nursing research can make significant contributions toward understanding the needs of patients, examining the effectiveness of nursing interventions, and exploring the linkages among patient problems, nursing activities, and patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerception of problems for homecare patients with AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158201-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perception of problems for homecare patients with AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ortiz, Christine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California Departmentt of Mental Health</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, San Francisco, CA, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the perceived problems, physical status, and psychological support of patients with AIDS who are receiving home-based nursing care services.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Background: Early intervention in HIV disease and aggressive treatment strategies in the care of persons with AIDS have resulted in the prolonged survival of persons infected with HIV. Experts have suggested that HIV-infected individuals are living longer. Thus, the evolving chronicity of the disease is providing the impetus for the shift from inpatient care to out patient and home care treatment.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Methodology: This analysis is part of a longitudinal descriptive study examining the Quality of Nursing Care for People with AIDS in home and in-home hospice care. A convenience sample of 64 males with AIDS receiving homecare services were interviewed within the first week of admission to the Visiting Nurses and Hospice of San Francisco. Patients were asked the following: 1) identify three or four major problems; 2) describe how the nurse was helping to manage those problems; and to 3) rate their physical condition and psychological support on a scale from 1 to 10, where 1 = very poor and 10 = excellent.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Results: The sample was predominantly Caucasian with a mean age of 40.8 and sexual practice reported as the source of infection. Content analysis of patient reported problems varied from pain, fatigue, to depression. Patient reported nurses activities ranged from education to support type of activities. The mean score for physical condition was 5.04 (SD 1.93) and for psychological support was 8.08 (SD 2.22).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Implications and Significance: As the provision of homecare services for persons living with HIV/AIDS has continued to rise, it is imperative to examine the quality of nursing care of patients with AIDS receiving home based nursing care services. Nursing research can make significant contributions toward understanding the needs of patients, examining the effectiveness of nursing interventions, and exploring the linkages among patient problems, nursing activities, and patient outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:36:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:36:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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