2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158202
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Risk Factors for HIV Infection in Runaway and Homeless Adolescents
Abstract:
Risk Factors for HIV Infection in Runaway and Homeless Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:1995
Author:Moon, Martha
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
SON
Contact Address:, San Francisco, CA, USA
Specific Aim: The aim of this research project is to examine the

associations of risk factors with HIV infection by comparing the

distribution of the risk factors in infected runaway and homeless

adolescents with that in non-infected runaway and homeless

adolescents.



Rationale and background: Urban street youth are one of the

current waves of the HIV epidemic in the United States. Because of

the seven to nine year latency period between HIV infection and

onset of AIDS defining illnesses, many adolescents who are infected

with HIV will not develop AIDS until they are adults. In

seroprevalence surveys conducted in 1993 among 1,165 youth

attending clinics at homeless youth centers in San Francisco, HIV

seroprevalence was 26% among men who have sex with men, 50% among

men who have sex with men and inject drugs (IDUs), 0% among

heterosexual male IDUs, 0.7% among male heterosexuals who are not

IDUs, and 0.8% among female heterosexuals who are not IDUs. The

fact that many HIV-infected adolescents are unaware of their HIV

status or appear to be in good health makes it more difficult to

conduct effective education, treatment and research. Since risk

taking is a normal part of adolescent development, is there a way

to discriminate between risk activities that lead to HIV and those

that do not? This study will attempt to determine a constellation

of risk factors which are related to HIV infection.



Research methodology: Using a case-control research design with a

case:control ratio of 1:4, adolescents aged 12-21 years, who have

been tested for HIV antibodies in 1993 and 1994 at two sites in San

Francisco which serve homeless and runaway youth were compared

using chart review. A total of 23 HIV positive cases and 92 HIV

negative controls were investigated. HIV status is a biologically

measurable outcome variable against which to compare social and

behavioral variables, such as history of sexual abuse, history of

physical abuse, needle use, alcohol and other drug use history,

sexual history (including condom use; sex with known HIV positive

partner; trading sex for food, drugs, money, or shelter; self-

identification as gay, straight, or bisexual), recent life changes,

and living situation.



Research findings/results: The data analysis and results will be

completed by March, 1995 and will be available for presentation at

this conference.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRisk Factors for HIV Infection in Runaway and Homeless Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158202-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Risk Factors for HIV Infection in Runaway and Homeless Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moon, Martha</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco<br/>SON</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, San Francisco, CA, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Specific Aim: The aim of this research project is to examine the<br/><br/>associations of risk factors with HIV infection by comparing the<br/><br/>distribution of the risk factors in infected runaway and homeless<br/><br/>adolescents with that in non-infected runaway and homeless<br/><br/>adolescents.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Rationale and background: Urban street youth are one of the<br/><br/>current waves of the HIV epidemic in the United States. Because of<br/><br/>the seven to nine year latency period between HIV infection and<br/><br/>onset of AIDS defining illnesses, many adolescents who are infected<br/><br/>with HIV will not develop AIDS until they are adults. In<br/><br/>seroprevalence surveys conducted in 1993 among 1,165 youth<br/><br/>attending clinics at homeless youth centers in San Francisco, HIV<br/><br/>seroprevalence was 26% among men who have sex with men, 50% among<br/><br/>men who have sex with men and inject drugs (IDUs), 0% among<br/><br/>heterosexual male IDUs, 0.7% among male heterosexuals who are not<br/><br/>IDUs, and 0.8% among female heterosexuals who are not IDUs. The<br/><br/>fact that many HIV-infected adolescents are unaware of their HIV<br/><br/>status or appear to be in good health makes it more difficult to<br/><br/>conduct effective education, treatment and research. Since risk<br/><br/>taking is a normal part of adolescent development, is there a way<br/><br/>to discriminate between risk activities that lead to HIV and those<br/><br/>that do not? This study will attempt to determine a constellation<br/><br/>of risk factors which are related to HIV infection.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Research methodology: Using a case-control research design with a<br/><br/>case:control ratio of 1:4, adolescents aged 12-21 years, who have<br/><br/>been tested for HIV antibodies in 1993 and 1994 at two sites in San<br/><br/>Francisco which serve homeless and runaway youth were compared<br/><br/>using chart review. A total of 23 HIV positive cases and 92 HIV<br/><br/>negative controls were investigated. HIV status is a biologically<br/><br/>measurable outcome variable against which to compare social and<br/><br/>behavioral variables, such as history of sexual abuse, history of<br/><br/>physical abuse, needle use, alcohol and other drug use history,<br/><br/>sexual history (including condom use; sex with known HIV positive<br/><br/>partner; trading sex for food, drugs, money, or shelter; self-<br/><br/>identification as gay, straight, or bisexual), recent life changes,<br/><br/>and living situation.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Research findings/results: The data analysis and results will be<br/><br/>completed by March, 1995 and will be available for presentation at<br/><br/>this conference.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:36:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:36:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.