2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158205
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effectiveness in the role of the critical care nurse manager
Abstract:
Effectiveness in the role of the critical care nurse manager
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:1996
Author:Cardin, Suzette, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of California at Los Angeles Medical Center10833 LeConte Ave
Title:Nurse Manager
Contact Address:14-176 CHS, MC 170606, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA
Contact Telephone:3108252639
Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine leadership characteristics, behaviors and skills of critical care nurse managers that enhance ICU unit outcomes.



Design: A predictive correlation design.



Sample: 645 subjects which included 81 nurse managers, 454 staff nurses and 110 physicians who worked in hospitals greater than 250 beds in southern California. A total of 49 hospitals were included in the study.



Variables and outcome measures: The study examined the relationship between three independent (predictor) variables: 1) ICU nursing leadership, communication and problem-solving; 2) Leadership behaviors and practices; and 3) Situational leadership styles to four dependent (outcome) variables: decreased staff nurse turnover and perceived effectiveness in recruiting and retaining staff nurses, in the technical quality of care and in meeting family member needs.



Method: An analytical survey method was used to collect data. The following instruments were used to collect data: 1) ICU Nurse/Physician Questionnaire (Shortell, et. al., 1991); 2) Leadership Practices Inventory Self and Others, (Kouzes & Posner, 1988); 3) LEAD Self and Others (Hersey and Blanchard, 1972); and 4) a researcher developed demographic questionnaire. The plan for statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, correlation analyses and multiple regression analyses.



Findings: The relationship between ICU nursing leadership, communication and problem-solving and perceived effectiveness in recruiting and retaining staff nurses and quality of care provided was supported in both nurse manager and staff nurse/physician group; whereas the same relationship and meeting family member needs was only supported in the nurse manager group. Leadership behaviors and practices were supported in both groups but the relationships among the variables was not as consistent as the relationship of ICU nursing leadership, communication and problem-solving. Situational leadership style was not supported in either group as a leadership style that could be used as a predictor variable. Multiple regression analyses using eight predictor and four outcome variables was used to test the model, a percentage of the variance in the model was explained by the multiple regression analyses.



Conclusions: A model of effective nurse leaders was proposed, tested and revised based on the results of the study. The research findings highlight the need for a leadership style that is able to meet the demands of today's changing healthcare environment.



Clinical Implications: ICU nurse manager's leadership characteristics, behaviors and practices do affect unit outcomes and highlights the relationship of leadership style to outcomes of unit effectiveness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffectiveness in the role of the critical care nurse manageren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158205-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effectiveness in the role of the critical care nurse manager</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1996</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cardin, Suzette, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California at Los Angeles Medical Center10833 LeConte Ave</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">14-176 CHS, MC 170606, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3108252639</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">NSSC@mednet.ucla.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine leadership characteristics, behaviors and skills of critical care nurse managers that enhance ICU unit outcomes.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Design: A predictive correlation design.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Sample: 645 subjects which included 81 nurse managers, 454 staff nurses and 110 physicians who worked in hospitals greater than 250 beds in southern California. A total of 49 hospitals were included in the study.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Variables and outcome measures: The study examined the relationship between three independent (predictor) variables: 1) ICU nursing leadership, communication and problem-solving; 2) Leadership behaviors and practices; and 3) Situational leadership styles to four dependent (outcome) variables: decreased staff nurse turnover and perceived effectiveness in recruiting and retaining staff nurses, in the technical quality of care and in meeting family member needs.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Method: An analytical survey method was used to collect data. The following instruments were used to collect data: 1) ICU Nurse/Physician Questionnaire (Shortell, et. al., 1991); 2) Leadership Practices Inventory Self and Others, (Kouzes &amp; Posner, 1988); 3) LEAD Self and Others (Hersey and Blanchard, 1972); and 4) a researcher developed demographic questionnaire. The plan for statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, correlation analyses and multiple regression analyses.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings: The relationship between ICU nursing leadership, communication and problem-solving and perceived effectiveness in recruiting and retaining staff nurses and quality of care provided was supported in both nurse manager and staff nurse/physician group; whereas the same relationship and meeting family member needs was only supported in the nurse manager group. Leadership behaviors and practices were supported in both groups but the relationships among the variables was not as consistent as the relationship of ICU nursing leadership, communication and problem-solving. Situational leadership style was not supported in either group as a leadership style that could be used as a predictor variable. Multiple regression analyses using eight predictor and four outcome variables was used to test the model, a percentage of the variance in the model was explained by the multiple regression analyses. <br/><br/><br/><br/>Conclusions: A model of effective nurse leaders was proposed, tested and revised based on the results of the study. The research findings highlight the need for a leadership style that is able to meet the demands of today's changing healthcare environment.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Clinical Implications: ICU nurse manager's leadership characteristics, behaviors and practices do affect unit outcomes and highlights the relationship of leadership style to outcomes of unit effectiveness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:36:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:36:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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