2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158208
Type:
Presentation
Title:
24-Hour activity patterns in enterally fed rats
Abstract:
24-Hour activity patterns in enterally fed rats
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:1998
Author:Westfall, Una, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR, 97201, USA
Contact Telephone:503.494.8311
Enteral feedings may well disrupt usual social patterns as well as alter expected activity-rest cycles. Such changes may shift the energy intake-energy expenditure balance of an individual. To begin exploring this phenomenon, a well established nutrition animal model (rat) was used. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if there were activity patterns in rats receiving enteral feedings on different schedules (24 vs. 12 hour) and using different delivery methods (continuous pump vs. intermittent bolus). Rats are nocturnal. Thus, usual rest time was during the light phase (0800-2000 hrs); activity time, during the dark phase (2000-0800 hrs).



A single case design with replication was used with adult, male Sprague Dawley rats. Each animal participated in a 28 day protocol during which environmental acclimation to a 12 hr light:12 hr dark cycle began 7 days before surgical insertion of a #100-0001 model VM-FH Mini-Mitter activity transmitter and a gastrostomy tube. Animals recovered from surgery and adjusted to liquid food and feeding schedules during post-op Days 1-10. Enteral feedings by pump or intermittent bolus were started on post-op Day 11 and lasted through Day 21. Animal movements monitored at 5 minute intervals were processed through the automated DataCol 3 System, and stored as data counts in an IBM computer.



Activity spikes were plotted for 10 minute epochs to enable visual inspection of each animal's activity bin. Below are three individual animal charts. Each day is represented by horizontal lines. Numbers on the left side of the charts denotes Post-op Day. Beginning on the left, the rat received enteral feedings by 24-hr continuous infusion; 12-hr infusion; and 12-hr intermittent bolus delivery, respectively.



During post-op Days 11-20, activity differences were detected in these three animals. The rat receiving continuous enteral feedings showed motion throughout the usual rest and activity time periods. Those receiving food only during 12-hr rest periods had more motion during usual activity periods than during rest periods. There was more rest time activity by the rat on a bolus feeding schedule. Thus, differences in activity could be detected in this animal model, with the greatest departure from expected activity found in the animal receiving continuous enteral feeding.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title24-Hour activity patterns in enterally fed ratsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158208-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">24-Hour activity patterns in enterally fed rats</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1998</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Westfall, Una, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR, 97201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503.494.8311</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">westfall@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Enteral feedings may well disrupt usual social patterns as well as alter expected activity-rest cycles. Such changes may shift the energy intake-energy expenditure balance of an individual. To begin exploring this phenomenon, a well established nutrition animal model (rat) was used. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if there were activity patterns in rats receiving enteral feedings on different schedules (24 vs. 12 hour) and using different delivery methods (continuous pump vs. intermittent bolus). Rats are nocturnal. Thus, usual rest time was during the light phase (0800-2000 hrs); activity time, during the dark phase (2000-0800 hrs).<br/><br/><br/><br/>A single case design with replication was used with adult, male Sprague Dawley rats. Each animal participated in a 28 day protocol during which environmental acclimation to a 12 hr light:12 hr dark cycle began 7 days before surgical insertion of a #100-0001 model VM-FH Mini-Mitter activity transmitter and a gastrostomy tube. Animals recovered from surgery and adjusted to liquid food and feeding schedules during post-op Days 1-10. Enteral feedings by pump or intermittent bolus were started on post-op Day 11 and lasted through Day 21. Animal movements monitored at 5 minute intervals were processed through the automated DataCol 3 System, and stored as data counts in an IBM computer.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Activity spikes were plotted for 10 minute epochs to enable visual inspection of each animal's activity bin. Below are three individual animal charts. Each day is represented by horizontal lines. Numbers on the left side of the charts denotes Post-op Day. Beginning on the left, the rat received enteral feedings by 24-hr continuous infusion; 12-hr infusion; and 12-hr intermittent bolus delivery, respectively.<br/><br/><br/><br/>During post-op Days 11-20, activity differences were detected in these three animals. The rat receiving continuous enteral feedings showed motion throughout the usual rest and activity time periods. Those receiving food only during 12-hr rest periods had more motion during usual activity periods than during rest periods. There was more rest time activity by the rat on a bolus feeding schedule. Thus, differences in activity could be detected in this animal model, with the greatest departure from expected activity found in the animal receiving continuous enteral feeding.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:37:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:37:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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