2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158209
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of tube feeding sensations reported by young and elder adults
Abstract:
Comparison of tube feeding sensations reported by young and elder adults
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:1998
Author:Westfall, Una, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR, 97201, USA
Contact Telephone:503.494.8311
Problem and Foundation: Nurses are in key roles to aid persons adapting to nutrient delivery through alternate routes such as tube feedings. A necessary prerequisite for sensory preparation is knowing what is experienced with tube feedings. Though published tube feeding studies recount varied GI sensations in adults, many reports are over a decade old and were conducted when tube feeding technology was not as advanced as it is now. Further, although tube feedings are used with young and old adults, it is not known if sensations are experienced differently across adult age groups. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify and compare sensations in 2 different adult age groups receiving tube feedings.



Sample: Seventy-four ambulatory adults, ages 19-91, with current or recent tube feeding experience, were recruited and divided into 2 groups: young (<60 years) N=35; and elder (>/= 60 years) N=39. The mean +/- SD age of the young group was 47 +/- 9.8 years; the elder group, 72 +/- 8.5 years. There were no significant differences (p>.05) between the two groups for ethnicity, educational level, medical diagnostic categories, tube origin, and duration of tube feeding. The majority of tubes were placed through the abdomen and delivered formula into the stomach of 20 young, and 32 elder, subjects.



Methods: In this prospective descriptive study, subjects participated in a one-time telephone interview with trained project members that followed a developed script. The script had been pilot-tested for completeness and subject appropriateness. After collecting demographic data, each subject was asked to identify any GI and non-GI sensations experienced with tube feedings. When a sensation was named, the subject quantified dimensions of frequency, intensity, unpleasantness, and management difficulty using 5-point Likert-type scales (5=high). Descriptive statistics and 1-way ANOVAs were used in analysis.



Results: A total of 318 GI sensations and 218 non-GI sensations were reported by the 74 subjects. Of the 318 GI sensations, there were 23 different ones: 23 in the young group; 19 in the elder group. Significantly more (p<.05) GI sensation occurred in the young group compared to the elders (t.3 +/- 2.5 vs. 3.4 +/- 2.2). Young subjects reported a span of 1 to 11 GI sensations each, with 74% reporting 1 to 6 such sensations. The 6 GI sensations that 12 or more young subjects reported were fullness (n=19), gas (n=17), diarrhea (n=15), cramping (n=14), nausea (n=13), and belching (n=12). he span of GI sensation in the elder group was 0 to 9, with 59% reporting 0 to 3 GI sensations. Fullness was the only GI sensation > 12 elder subjects reported (n=18). The next most often reported GI sensations were diarrhea (n=11), gas (n=10), hunger (n=10), craving food (n=9), nausea (n=9), and sour taste (n=9). Of all GI sensations, elders reported only heartburn more than younger subjects (6 vs. 1).



Of the 218 non-GI sensations, there were 20 different ones: 20 reported in the young group; 17 reported in the elder group. These sensations can be clustered around the tube itself or other feelings such as embarrassment, loss of control, exclusion by others, and weakness. Significantly more (p<.05) non-GI sensations occurred in the young group compared to the elders (3.9 +/- 2.1 vs. 2.1 +/- 1.6). Young subjects reported a span of 1 to 9 non-GI sensations each, with 66% reporting 1 to 4 such sensations. The 5 non-GI sensations that 11 or more younger subjects reported were soreness at insertion site (n=24), discharge around tube (n=20), embarrassed (n=13), pulling of tube (n=13), and feeling scared (n=11). The span of non-GI sensations in the elder group was 0 to 6, with 21% reporting 0, and 46%, 1 to 2 non-GI sensations. In the elder group, soreness at the site was most often reported (n=14), followed by discharge around tube (n=12), feeling embarrassed (n=10), and hesitant to move (n=9). Of the non-GI sensations, all were noted more often by the young, rather than the elder, group. Though only 4 subjects reported depression with tube feedings, this sensation was severe enough for an elder subject to report considering suicide.



Conclusions: Many different GI-related and non-GI sensations were experienced in both age groups. Significantly more GI and non-GI sensations were reported by young subjects when compared with elders. These findings suggest the importance of support with enteral therapy and that age-specific sensation findings should be considered in preparation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of tube feeding sensations reported by young and elder adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158209-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of tube feeding sensations reported by young and elder adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1998</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Westfall, Una, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR, 97201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503.494.8311</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">westfall@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem and Foundation: Nurses are in key roles to aid persons adapting to nutrient delivery through alternate routes such as tube feedings. A necessary prerequisite for sensory preparation is knowing what is experienced with tube feedings. Though published tube feeding studies recount varied GI sensations in adults, many reports are over a decade old and were conducted when tube feeding technology was not as advanced as it is now. Further, although tube feedings are used with young and old adults, it is not known if sensations are experienced differently across adult age groups. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify and compare sensations in 2 different adult age groups receiving tube feedings.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Sample: Seventy-four ambulatory adults, ages 19-91, with current or recent tube feeding experience, were recruited and divided into 2 groups: young (&lt;60 years) N=35; and elder (&gt;/= 60 years) N=39. The mean +/- SD age of the young group was 47 +/- 9.8 years; the elder group, 72 +/- 8.5 years. There were no significant differences (p&gt;.05) between the two groups for ethnicity, educational level, medical diagnostic categories, tube origin, and duration of tube feeding. The majority of tubes were placed through the abdomen and delivered formula into the stomach of 20 young, and 32 elder, subjects.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Methods: In this prospective descriptive study, subjects participated in a one-time telephone interview with trained project members that followed a developed script. The script had been pilot-tested for completeness and subject appropriateness. After collecting demographic data, each subject was asked to identify any GI and non-GI sensations experienced with tube feedings. When a sensation was named, the subject quantified dimensions of frequency, intensity, unpleasantness, and management difficulty using 5-point Likert-type scales (5=high). Descriptive statistics and 1-way ANOVAs were used in analysis.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Results: A total of 318 GI sensations and 218 non-GI sensations were reported by the 74 subjects. Of the 318 GI sensations, there were 23 different ones: 23 in the young group; 19 in the elder group. Significantly more (p&lt;.05) GI sensation occurred in the young group compared to the elders (t.3 +/- 2.5 vs. 3.4 +/- 2.2). Young subjects reported a span of 1 to 11 GI sensations each, with 74% reporting 1 to 6 such sensations. The 6 GI sensations that 12 or more young subjects reported were fullness (n=19), gas (n=17), diarrhea (n=15), cramping (n=14), nausea (n=13), and belching (n=12). he span of GI sensation in the elder group was 0 to 9, with 59% reporting 0 to 3 GI sensations. Fullness was the only GI sensation &gt; 12 elder subjects reported (n=18). The next most often reported GI sensations were diarrhea (n=11), gas (n=10), hunger (n=10), craving food (n=9), nausea (n=9), and sour taste (n=9). Of all GI sensations, elders reported only heartburn more than younger subjects (6 vs. 1).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Of the 218 non-GI sensations, there were 20 different ones: 20 reported in the young group; 17 reported in the elder group. These sensations can be clustered around the tube itself or other feelings such as embarrassment, loss of control, exclusion by others, and weakness. Significantly more (p&lt;.05) non-GI sensations occurred in the young group compared to the elders (3.9 +/- 2.1 vs. 2.1 +/- 1.6). Young subjects reported a span of 1 to 9 non-GI sensations each, with 66% reporting 1 to 4 such sensations. The 5 non-GI sensations that 11 or more younger subjects reported were soreness at insertion site (n=24), discharge around tube (n=20), embarrassed (n=13), pulling of tube (n=13), and feeling scared (n=11). The span of non-GI sensations in the elder group was 0 to 6, with 21% reporting 0, and 46%, 1 to 2 non-GI sensations. In the elder group, soreness at the site was most often reported (n=14), followed by discharge around tube (n=12), feeling embarrassed (n=10), and hesitant to move (n=9). Of the non-GI sensations, all were noted more often by the young, rather than the elder, group. Though only 4 subjects reported depression with tube feedings, this sensation was severe enough for an elder subject to report considering suicide.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Conclusions: Many different GI-related and non-GI sensations were experienced in both age groups. Significantly more GI and non-GI sensations were reported by young subjects when compared with elders. These findings suggest the importance of support with enteral therapy and that age-specific sensation findings should be considered in preparation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:37:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:37:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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