2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158210
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sensations experienced by adults receiving tube feedings
Abstract:
Sensations experienced by adults receiving tube feedings
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:1998
Author:Westfall, Una, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR, 97201, USA
Contact Telephone:503.494.8311
There is a dearth of knowledge about sensations of patients receiving full caloric tube feedings. In a 1979 multicenter descriptive nursing study by Padilla and colleagues, adult patients reported various GI distresses linked to enteral feedings. This classic study has not been replicated, nor has one been reported using the smaller, more flexible tubes or liquid diets that were not available two decades ago. Thus, in this pilot study the following question was asked: what sensations are currently reported by adults receiving tube feedings?



Eleven adults, ages 38-71, receiving tube feedings following oncology head and neck surgery comprise the sample. Eight of the 9 men and 2 women were >/= 60 years old. Six subjects had prior experiences with tube feedings. Duration of the current tube feedings ranged from 13 to 343 days. All but one subject received feedings on intermittent schedules. Seven had nasogastric tubes, four, gastrostomy tubes. Only two subjects were allowed small amounts of oral liquids; the remaining 9 received nothing by mouth.



In this descriptive pilot study, subjects were interviewed during a post surgery clinical visit by trained project staff. A semistructured guide was used to ask about sensations with current tube feedings. For each sensation reported, subjects were asked it's a) frequency, b) intensity, and c) unpleasantness. Intensity and unpleasantness were rated on a 5 point Likert-type scale (5=overwhelming). Descriptive statistics were used to summarize findings.



Ten subjects described at least on GI-related, or another, sensation linked to tube feedings. Twelve different GI-related sensations were identified by 9 subjects for a total of 18 GI sensations. Multiple subjects identified fullness (n=4); craving fluids (n=3); and nausea (n=2). When classifying responses, one sensation was positive (comfortable); one could be positive, neural or negative (fullness), and the remaining 10 were negative. Three subjects reported 3 different sensations, 3 subjects, 2 sensations; and 3 subjects, only 1.



Six other sensations linked to tube feedings were reported by 7 subjects for a total of 12 such sensations. All were viewed as negative. The presence of a foreign object in the nose/throat (n=4); dry or sore throat (n=3); and coolness in nose/throat (n=2) were most commonly reported. Additional sensations identified singly were feeling embarrassed, afraid to move, and weakness.



Most sensations occurred only occasionally or intermittently and did not cause much disruption for subjects. The highest intensity and unpleasantness (5 on 1-5 scale) were reported for aching/sore throat (n=2); nausea (n=1); and craving a drink of fluid (n=1). Except for the sore throat, other negative sensations were time limited and, with often reported feeding adjustments, subjects indicated the intensity and unpleasantness diminished.



Both GI-related and other sensations were experienced by these adults receiving enteral feedings. However, when compared with findings of Padilla and colleagues, the number and intensity of sensations were considerably less today. Diversity and characteristics of these sensations challenge caregivers to clarify what is being felt in order to understand and initiate appropriate actions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSensations experienced by adults receiving tube feedingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158210-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sensations experienced by adults receiving tube feedings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1998</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Westfall, Una, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR, 97201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503.494.8311</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">westfall@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There is a dearth of knowledge about sensations of patients receiving full caloric tube feedings. In a 1979 multicenter descriptive nursing study by Padilla and colleagues, adult patients reported various GI distresses linked to enteral feedings. This classic study has not been replicated, nor has one been reported using the smaller, more flexible tubes or liquid diets that were not available two decades ago. Thus, in this pilot study the following question was asked: what sensations are currently reported by adults receiving tube feedings?<br/><br/><br/><br/>Eleven adults, ages 38-71, receiving tube feedings following oncology head and neck surgery comprise the sample. Eight of the 9 men and 2 women were &gt;/= 60 years old. Six subjects had prior experiences with tube feedings. Duration of the current tube feedings ranged from 13 to 343 days. All but one subject received feedings on intermittent schedules. Seven had nasogastric tubes, four, gastrostomy tubes. Only two subjects were allowed small amounts of oral liquids; the remaining 9 received nothing by mouth.<br/><br/><br/><br/>In this descriptive pilot study, subjects were interviewed during a post surgery clinical visit by trained project staff. A semistructured guide was used to ask about sensations with current tube feedings. For each sensation reported, subjects were asked it's a) frequency, b) intensity, and c) unpleasantness. Intensity and unpleasantness were rated on a 5 point Likert-type scale (5=overwhelming). Descriptive statistics were used to summarize findings.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Ten subjects described at least on GI-related, or another, sensation linked to tube feedings. Twelve different GI-related sensations were identified by 9 subjects for a total of 18 GI sensations. Multiple subjects identified fullness (n=4); craving fluids (n=3); and nausea (n=2). When classifying responses, one sensation was positive (comfortable); one could be positive, neural or negative (fullness), and the remaining 10 were negative. Three subjects reported 3 different sensations, 3 subjects, 2 sensations; and 3 subjects, only 1.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Six other sensations linked to tube feedings were reported by 7 subjects for a total of 12 such sensations. All were viewed as negative. The presence of a foreign object in the nose/throat (n=4); dry or sore throat (n=3); and coolness in nose/throat (n=2) were most commonly reported. Additional sensations identified singly were feeling embarrassed, afraid to move, and weakness.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Most sensations occurred only occasionally or intermittently and did not cause much disruption for subjects. The highest intensity and unpleasantness (5 on 1-5 scale) were reported for aching/sore throat (n=2); nausea (n=1); and craving a drink of fluid (n=1). Except for the sore throat, other negative sensations were time limited and, with often reported feeding adjustments, subjects indicated the intensity and unpleasantness diminished.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Both GI-related and other sensations were experienced by these adults receiving enteral feedings. However, when compared with findings of Padilla and colleagues, the number and intensity of sensations were considerably less today. Diversity and characteristics of these sensations challenge caregivers to clarify what is being felt in order to understand and initiate appropriate actions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:37:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:37:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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