2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158212
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Salivary cortisol values in nursing research: Methodological challenges
Abstract:
Salivary cortisol values in nursing research: Methodological challenges
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:1998
Author:Westfall, Una, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR, 97201, USA
Contact Telephone:503.494.8311
As a measure of stress of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function, systemic cortisol is key. Blood levels contain both bound and biologically active forms of cortisol with assays almost always measuring the total amount without separating the two forms. Since serum proteins do not diffuse into saliva, salivary levels of cortisol reflect only the "free" portion, which consist of -5-19% of serium total cortisol.



Salivary cortisol has several advantages when compared with blood cortisol. However, the techniques of collection and assay must be addressed when considering reliable and valid measurement of unbound cortisol. This presentation will emphasize sampling and assay issues and their impact on reliable and true levels. Work done with the campus General Clinical Research Center Core Laboratory staff that established a double antibody chemiluminescence assay for salivary cortisol will be highlighted. An advantage of the chemiluminescence assay is that it is not radioactive.



Advantages and disadvantages of different collection methods will be examined. Insights gained from practical experience with adults about selected methods will be discussed. In the process of refining the salivary cortisol assay, volume collection options included stimulation of saliva, materials, and duration of stimulation. An overview of up-to-date storage information will be presented.



The chemiluminescence assay method for salivary cortisol was refined by laboratory technicians. Values as low as 2nmols/L (0.07ug/100ml) have been consistently measured. The slope of the values is linear through 44.8nmol/L (1.6ug/100ml). For concentrations higher than 44.8nmol/L, a different linear slope is evident. This finding is consistent with work by Vining and colleagues that identified a change in slope at -50.0nmol./L.



To increase confidence in measured salivary cortisol concentrations, knowledge of decision points and options can assist the researcher in making informed choices and developing uniform procedures for salivary cortisol sampling and samples. Such planning can minimize preventable errors in application of this noninvasive source of cortisol.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSalivary cortisol values in nursing research: Methodological challengesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158212-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Salivary cortisol values in nursing research: Methodological challenges</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1998</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Westfall, Una, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR, 97201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503.494.8311</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">westfall@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As a measure of stress of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function, systemic cortisol is key. Blood levels contain both bound and biologically active forms of cortisol with assays almost always measuring the total amount without separating the two forms. Since serum proteins do not diffuse into saliva, salivary levels of cortisol reflect only the &quot;free&quot; portion, which consist of -5-19% of serium total cortisol.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Salivary cortisol has several advantages when compared with blood cortisol. However, the techniques of collection and assay must be addressed when considering reliable and valid measurement of unbound cortisol. This presentation will emphasize sampling and assay issues and their impact on reliable and true levels. Work done with the campus General Clinical Research Center Core Laboratory staff that established a double antibody chemiluminescence assay for salivary cortisol will be highlighted. An advantage of the chemiluminescence assay is that it is not radioactive.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Advantages and disadvantages of different collection methods will be examined. Insights gained from practical experience with adults about selected methods will be discussed. In the process of refining the salivary cortisol assay, volume collection options included stimulation of saliva, materials, and duration of stimulation. An overview of up-to-date storage information will be presented.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The chemiluminescence assay method for salivary cortisol was refined by laboratory technicians. Values as low as 2nmols/L (0.07ug/100ml) have been consistently measured. The slope of the values is linear through 44.8nmol/L (1.6ug/100ml). For concentrations higher than 44.8nmol/L, a different linear slope is evident. This finding is consistent with work by Vining and colleagues that identified a change in slope at -50.0nmol./L.<br/><br/><br/><br/>To increase confidence in measured salivary cortisol concentrations, knowledge of decision points and options can assist the researcher in making informed choices and developing uniform procedures for salivary cortisol sampling and samples. Such planning can minimize preventable errors in application of this noninvasive source of cortisol.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:37:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:37:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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