2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158213
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Life Closure Scale: Additive Psychometric Testing
Abstract:
The Life Closure Scale: Additive Psychometric Testing
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Dobratz, Marjorie, RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Tacoma
Title:Professor
Contact Address:1900 Commerce Street, Box 358421, Tacoma, WA, 98402, USA
Contact Telephone:(253) 692-5676
Problem. Because psychological adaptation in dying individuals lacks theoretical clarification, tools by which to measure this construct are lacking (Mor, 1986). Dimensions of psychological well being in dying populations are often overlooked as researchers focus on depression and anxiety (Moody et al., 2000). This study's purpose was to establish additional psychometric properties on an instrument designed to measure psychological adaptation in persons experiencing terminal illness. Theoretical framework. A retroductive triangulation method (Quayhagen & Quayhagen, 1988) was used to develop the original Life Closure Scale (LCS). The theoretical framework supported a multidimensional scale of dying individuals' attempt to find meaning (Frankel, 1963; Weisman & Worden, 1975; Taylor, 1983) and maintain self-integrity by adapting to self and environment influences (Haan, 1969, 1977) and restructuring dreaded and stressful life situations (Parkes, 1971, 1972). Preliminary testing identified a 27 item tool with the two sub-scales (self-reconciled and self-restructuring) whose internal consistency reliability coefficients were r = .86 and r = .85, respectively. Sample. A small, pilot sample of 20 hospice subjects completed initial testing sessions. A larger sample of 113 home hospice subjects who met established criterion and who gave informed consent finished additional psychometric testing. Their gender breakdown was 66 males and 47 females, with a mean age of 65.9 years (range 30 to 89). The subjects' diagnoses were 90 cancer, 10 AIDS, six ALS, and seven other diseases. Methods. The two participating hospice programs and the supporting university gave human subjects approval. Testing occurred in the subjects' home settings, which ranged from private homes to skilled nursing facilities. To protect an extremely vulnerable and physically limited population, the original 27-item tool was reduced to 20 items. These 20 items were entered into psychometric analysis by way of the SAS statistical package. Findings. An alpha coefficient of .87 was obtained for the total scale. Cronbach's alphas for the two sub-scales were .80 for the self-reconciled and .82 for the self-restructuring. Item-total correlations for the sub-scales ranged from .39 to .67. Criterion related concurrent validity was measured by correlating scores with the Affect Balance Scale (Bradburn, 1969). A correlation of r = -.59 with the Negative Affect Scale showed a negative association with mental distress. Confirmatory factor analysis on the 20-item scale yielded two loadings. On the initial alpha extraction, five unrestricted factors with Eigenvalues of 1.0 or greater accounted for 58 % of variance, with the first two factors explaining 39.2 %. Next, varimax orthogonal rotation was performed and the first factor explained 20.6 % and the second 18.6 % of variance, with criterion coefficients produced that ranged from .42 to .78. All but one of the items on the self-reconciled scale loaded on the second factorial column and a theoretical meaning of "contentment" was construed. Those items that loaded on the first column were particular to the self-restructuring sub-scale; consequently, the theoretical interpretation of Factor 1 was "contention". Conclusions. Further psychometric testing of a tool designed to measure psychological adaptation in dying supported the reliability, construct validity, and theoretical interpretation of the Life Closure Scale. These findings lend credence to the use of this tool in determining levels of psychological well being in hospice/palliative care populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Life Closure Scale: Additive Psychometric Testingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158213-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Life Closure Scale: Additive Psychometric Testing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dobratz, Marjorie, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Tacoma</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1900 Commerce Street, Box 358421, Tacoma, WA, 98402, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(253) 692-5676</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mdobratz@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem. Because psychological adaptation in dying individuals lacks theoretical clarification, tools by which to measure this construct are lacking (Mor, 1986). Dimensions of psychological well being in dying populations are often overlooked as researchers focus on depression and anxiety (Moody et al., 2000). This study's purpose was to establish additional psychometric properties on an instrument designed to measure psychological adaptation in persons experiencing terminal illness. Theoretical framework. A retroductive triangulation method (Quayhagen &amp; Quayhagen, 1988) was used to develop the original Life Closure Scale (LCS). The theoretical framework supported a multidimensional scale of dying individuals' attempt to find meaning (Frankel, 1963; Weisman &amp; Worden, 1975; Taylor, 1983) and maintain self-integrity by adapting to self and environment influences (Haan, 1969, 1977) and restructuring dreaded and stressful life situations (Parkes, 1971, 1972). Preliminary testing identified a 27 item tool with the two sub-scales (self-reconciled and self-restructuring) whose internal consistency reliability coefficients were r = .86 and r = .85, respectively. Sample. A small, pilot sample of 20 hospice subjects completed initial testing sessions. A larger sample of 113 home hospice subjects who met established criterion and who gave informed consent finished additional psychometric testing. Their gender breakdown was 66 males and 47 females, with a mean age of 65.9 years (range 30 to 89). The subjects' diagnoses were 90 cancer, 10 AIDS, six ALS, and seven other diseases. Methods. The two participating hospice programs and the supporting university gave human subjects approval. Testing occurred in the subjects' home settings, which ranged from private homes to skilled nursing facilities. To protect an extremely vulnerable and physically limited population, the original 27-item tool was reduced to 20 items. These 20 items were entered into psychometric analysis by way of the SAS statistical package. Findings. An alpha coefficient of .87 was obtained for the total scale. Cronbach's alphas for the two sub-scales were .80 for the self-reconciled and .82 for the self-restructuring. Item-total correlations for the sub-scales ranged from .39 to .67. Criterion related concurrent validity was measured by correlating scores with the Affect Balance Scale (Bradburn, 1969). A correlation of r = -.59 with the Negative Affect Scale showed a negative association with mental distress. Confirmatory factor analysis on the 20-item scale yielded two loadings. On the initial alpha extraction, five unrestricted factors with Eigenvalues of 1.0 or greater accounted for 58 % of variance, with the first two factors explaining 39.2 %. Next, varimax orthogonal rotation was performed and the first factor explained 20.6 % and the second 18.6 % of variance, with criterion coefficients produced that ranged from .42 to .78. All but one of the items on the self-reconciled scale loaded on the second factorial column and a theoretical meaning of &quot;contentment&quot; was construed. Those items that loaded on the first column were particular to the self-restructuring sub-scale; consequently, the theoretical interpretation of Factor 1 was &quot;contention&quot;. Conclusions. Further psychometric testing of a tool designed to measure psychological adaptation in dying supported the reliability, construct validity, and theoretical interpretation of the Life Closure Scale. These findings lend credence to the use of this tool in determining levels of psychological well being in hospice/palliative care populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:37:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:37:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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