2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158215
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motivation, barriers & supports, and perceived fitness in midlife women
Abstract:
Motivation, barriers & supports, and perceived fitness in midlife women
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Bryant, Joanne
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Contact Address:School of Nursing, PO Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7266, USA
Contact Telephone:206.543.4090
Significance: Physical inactivity is associated with increased risk of chronic disease associated with aging. Yet midlife women in the US are not believed to be physically active enough to promote health and prevent disease. The absence of an easily administered, reliable, and valid physical activity scale for midlife women has hampered our understanding of how physical activity changes during the menopausal transition. Purpose: To examine perceptions of fitness and motivations, barriers, and supports for physical activity in women as they traverse the menopause transition. Methods: 176 women (age 43-62) participants in a longitudinal study responded to the Women's Physical Activity Index (Motivation, Barriers & Supports, Perceived Fitness scales) in early 2000 as part of an annual health questionnaire. Motivation consists of 11 yes/no questions exploring motives for physical activity. Barriers & Supports is a 28-item scale with yes/no responses for the presence/absence of each type of support followed by 5 scoring choices weighing impact of the support on the respondent's physical activity level. Perceived Fitness is a 14-item scale with 5 response choices. Mean exercise minutes recorded on daily diaries three days per month during the year were utilized for construct validation. The sample was classified into postmenopausal and the three stages of the menopausal transition developed by the investigators of this study. ANOVA by menopausal transition subgroups was tested for each scale and for mean daily exercise using Tukey's HSD test of significance. Scale items with low item-to-total correlation were deleted, others were recoded so that high scores = high levels of physical activity or support for physical activity. Mean, range, standard deviation were examined for each item and for complete scales. Results: ANOVA for mean daily exercise by menopause subgroup (early, middle, late, and post- menopausal) was significant, (f (3,77) = 6.485, p = .001), Tukey's HSD was significant between late transition and early (p = .000), and between late transition and middle (p = .03). ANOVA by menopausal subgroups of Perceived Fitness, Motivation, and Barriers and Supports were not significant. For the Barriers and Supports Scale, the top three supports were: convenient location to be physically active (M = 1.94; SD = 1.70), a safe place to be physically active (M =1.80; SD = 1.64), and a physical activity enjoyed alone (M = 1.53; SD = 1.53). The top three Barriers were: lack of others to take over tasks to allow time for activity (M = -. 97; SD = 1.48), a physical health problem (M = -.87; SD = 1.44), and lack of someone to be physically active with (M = -.84; SD = 1.37). For the Motivation scale the top three motivators were: to feel better/keep feeling good (n = 172, 82%), to remain flexible/be more flexible (n = 172, 81%), and to remain strong/get stronger (n = 172, 77%). Conclusions: Women in the late menopause transition differed significantly from those in either early or middle transition on mean minutes of exercise recorded daily in 1999. Insignificant differences between the same groups on Motivation, Perceived Fitness, and Barriers and Supports may reflect scale insensitivity or lack of difference on these constructs by menopausal transition status. Activities that are convenient, safe, and enjoyed alone support women's exercise, while lack of relief from tasks, health problems, and lack of someone to be active with prevent activity in this sample.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotivation, barriers & supports, and perceived fitness in midlife womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158215-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motivation, barriers &amp; supports, and perceived fitness in midlife women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bryant, Joanne</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, PO Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7266, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206.543.4090</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jpbryant@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Significance: Physical inactivity is associated with increased risk of chronic disease associated with aging. Yet midlife women in the US are not believed to be physically active enough to promote health and prevent disease. The absence of an easily administered, reliable, and valid physical activity scale for midlife women has hampered our understanding of how physical activity changes during the menopausal transition. Purpose: To examine perceptions of fitness and motivations, barriers, and supports for physical activity in women as they traverse the menopause transition. Methods: 176 women (age 43-62) participants in a longitudinal study responded to the Women's Physical Activity Index (Motivation, Barriers &amp; Supports, Perceived Fitness scales) in early 2000 as part of an annual health questionnaire. Motivation consists of 11 yes/no questions exploring motives for physical activity. Barriers &amp; Supports is a 28-item scale with yes/no responses for the presence/absence of each type of support followed by 5 scoring choices weighing impact of the support on the respondent's physical activity level. Perceived Fitness is a 14-item scale with 5 response choices. Mean exercise minutes recorded on daily diaries three days per month during the year were utilized for construct validation. The sample was classified into postmenopausal and the three stages of the menopausal transition developed by the investigators of this study. ANOVA by menopausal transition subgroups was tested for each scale and for mean daily exercise using Tukey's HSD test of significance. Scale items with low item-to-total correlation were deleted, others were recoded so that high scores = high levels of physical activity or support for physical activity. Mean, range, standard deviation were examined for each item and for complete scales. Results: ANOVA for mean daily exercise by menopause subgroup (early, middle, late, and post- menopausal) was significant, (f (3,77) = 6.485, p = .001), Tukey's HSD was significant between late transition and early (p = .000), and between late transition and middle (p = .03). ANOVA by menopausal subgroups of Perceived Fitness, Motivation, and Barriers and Supports were not significant. For the Barriers and Supports Scale, the top three supports were: convenient location to be physically active (M = 1.94; SD = 1.70), a safe place to be physically active (M =1.80; SD = 1.64), and a physical activity enjoyed alone (M = 1.53; SD = 1.53). The top three Barriers were: lack of others to take over tasks to allow time for activity (M = -. 97; SD = 1.48), a physical health problem (M = -.87; SD = 1.44), and lack of someone to be physically active with (M = -.84; SD = 1.37). For the Motivation scale the top three motivators were: to feel better/keep feeling good (n = 172, 82%), to remain flexible/be more flexible (n = 172, 81%), and to remain strong/get stronger (n = 172, 77%). Conclusions: Women in the late menopause transition differed significantly from those in either early or middle transition on mean minutes of exercise recorded daily in 1999. Insignificant differences between the same groups on Motivation, Perceived Fitness, and Barriers and Supports may reflect scale insensitivity or lack of difference on these constructs by menopausal transition status. Activities that are convenient, safe, and enjoyed alone support women's exercise, while lack of relief from tasks, health problems, and lack of someone to be active with prevent activity in this sample.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:37:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:37:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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