2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158223
Type:
Presentation
Title:
New patients in an evolving NP practice: Profiles
Abstract:
New patients in an evolving NP practice: Profiles
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Smolowitz, Janice
P.I. Institution Name:Columbia University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY, 10032, USA
Contact Telephone:212.305.0082
Statement of the Problem. In a fiercely competitive health care environment in which patients have the right to choose their sources of health care, who would choose a primary care provider who is not a physician? What are the reasons for these choices? To what extent are they influenced by advertising, and by word of mouth? Do these patterns change as the practice matures and attracts more patients? These are some of the questions addressed by this study. They are important, because they provide clues about the kind of marketing that is most effective in attracting new patients and information about the kinds of services that may be most needed. The purposes of this study were 1) to describe the characteristics of patients who enrolled in a new, commercially insured nurse practitioner primary care practice during its first three years of operation, and 2) to examine the extent to which changes occurred as the practice developed. Sample. The sample for the study was all 635 patients who made at least one visit to the practice during its first 3 years of operation, i.e., between August 1997 and June 2000. Method. The sample was sub-divided into 6 time-based groups, each reflecting a 6-month interval (except the first interval which was 5 months). The time 1 group entered the practice between August and December 1997; time 2 1/98-6/98, and so forth; time 6 patients enrolled between January and June, 2000. Profiles were constructed for each of these groups using descriptive statistics. The characteristics profiled included demographic characteristics, prior receipt of care from an NP, source of information about the practice, reason for choosing the practice, and primary reason for the visit/diagnosis. Data were collected from patient intake forms and charts. Change over time was examined using analysis of variance and Chi Square. Results. Demographic characteristics of patients showed relatively little change over time. At every time period new patients tended to be quite homogeneous: middle-aged (average 40.2 years), well educated (80.2% overall had college or graduate education), female (83.1%), and employed (67.7%), with relatively high incomes (36.6% had household incomes of at least $75,000). One quarter had received care from an NP previously. The only demographic characteristic that changed over time was age (average 37.9 years at time 1, 42.6 at time 4, and 38.6 at time 6). Reasons for choosing the practice and sources of information about it changed more markedly. The percentage of patients citing that they chose the practice because they wanted care from a NP decreased over time, but those wanting a female provider increased from 3.6% at time 1 to 45.5% at time 4 and 30% at time 6. Choice based on university affiliation of the practice was highest at the outset (33.3%), but decreased over time (3.3% at time 6). Sources of information about the practice understandably paralleled marketing strategies. Print media advertising, heaviest in the early months, was cited by 78% of new patients at time 1, but by 36.6% at time 6 when such advertising was less frequent. Referral by co-workers and other patients became increasingly important, cited by 7.4% at time 1, and 44.8% at time 6. At each period, physical examination, general illness symptoms and respiratory infections were the most frequent reasons for the visit. Conclusion. The patients who chose this groundbreaking practice at the outset were largely well-educated, employed women. This pattern remained constant. Marketing and institutional affiliation were influential early, but later rivaled by personal referrals which reflect satisfaction.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNew patients in an evolving NP practice: Profilesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158223-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">New patients in an evolving NP practice: Profiles</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smolowitz, Janice</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Columbia University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY, 10032, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">212.305.0082</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">js928@columbia.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Statement of the Problem. In a fiercely competitive health care environment in which patients have the right to choose their sources of health care, who would choose a primary care provider who is not a physician? What are the reasons for these choices? To what extent are they influenced by advertising, and by word of mouth? Do these patterns change as the practice matures and attracts more patients? These are some of the questions addressed by this study. They are important, because they provide clues about the kind of marketing that is most effective in attracting new patients and information about the kinds of services that may be most needed. The purposes of this study were 1) to describe the characteristics of patients who enrolled in a new, commercially insured nurse practitioner primary care practice during its first three years of operation, and 2) to examine the extent to which changes occurred as the practice developed. Sample. The sample for the study was all 635 patients who made at least one visit to the practice during its first 3 years of operation, i.e., between August 1997 and June 2000. Method. The sample was sub-divided into 6 time-based groups, each reflecting a 6-month interval (except the first interval which was 5 months). The time 1 group entered the practice between August and December 1997; time 2 1/98-6/98, and so forth; time 6 patients enrolled between January and June, 2000. Profiles were constructed for each of these groups using descriptive statistics. The characteristics profiled included demographic characteristics, prior receipt of care from an NP, source of information about the practice, reason for choosing the practice, and primary reason for the visit/diagnosis. Data were collected from patient intake forms and charts. Change over time was examined using analysis of variance and Chi Square. Results. Demographic characteristics of patients showed relatively little change over time. At every time period new patients tended to be quite homogeneous: middle-aged (average 40.2 years), well educated (80.2% overall had college or graduate education), female (83.1%), and employed (67.7%), with relatively high incomes (36.6% had household incomes of at least $75,000). One quarter had received care from an NP previously. The only demographic characteristic that changed over time was age (average 37.9 years at time 1, 42.6 at time 4, and 38.6 at time 6). Reasons for choosing the practice and sources of information about it changed more markedly. The percentage of patients citing that they chose the practice because they wanted care from a NP decreased over time, but those wanting a female provider increased from 3.6% at time 1 to 45.5% at time 4 and 30% at time 6. Choice based on university affiliation of the practice was highest at the outset (33.3%), but decreased over time (3.3% at time 6). Sources of information about the practice understandably paralleled marketing strategies. Print media advertising, heaviest in the early months, was cited by 78% of new patients at time 1, but by 36.6% at time 6 when such advertising was less frequent. Referral by co-workers and other patients became increasingly important, cited by 7.4% at time 1, and 44.8% at time 6. At each period, physical examination, general illness symptoms and respiratory infections were the most frequent reasons for the visit. Conclusion. The patients who chose this groundbreaking practice at the outset were largely well-educated, employed women. This pattern remained constant. Marketing and institutional affiliation were influential early, but later rivaled by personal referrals which reflect satisfaction.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:37:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:37:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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