2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158224
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hardiness and Spiritual Well-Being: Moderators of Professional Nurse Burnout
Abstract:
Hardiness and Spiritual Well-Being: Moderators of Professional Nurse Burnout
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Sims, Kathleen, MN
P.I. Institution Name:Linfield College
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing, 2255 NW Northrup, Portland, OR, 97210, USA
Contact Telephone:503.413.7170
It is widely acknowledged that nursing is a stressful profession. Nurses are assuming more responsibilities and striving to maintain a high quality of care. There is also a looming nursing shortage. These influences and more may all contribute to nurse burnout. With burnout a loss of nurses from the profession can occur, quality of care can diminish and professional satisfaction can be curtailed. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of hardiness and spiritual well-being as moderators of burnout in professional nurses. Pines (1993) model of burnout was used as the conceptual framework. This model proposes that people have goals and expectations, which are brought to a work environment. If those goals and expectations are met then existential significance or meaning and purpose is achieved. Such meaning and purpose was once found primarily in religion but now more people look for such satisfaction in work. When people fail to achieve meaning and purpose in work, burnout is likely to occur. A descriptive correlation study of a random sample of 200 registered nurses living in a western state was conducted. Nurses completed measures of demographic data, hardiness, spiritual well-being and burnout. Results demonstrated that existential well-being, a component of spiritual well-being related positively with hardiness and its components of control, challenge, and commitment. Hardiness and spiritual well-being were negatively related to burnout expressions of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and positively related with personal accomplishment. Age, years of experience, spiritual well-being and hardiness explained 33% of the variance in emotional exhaustion and 21% of the variance in depersonalization and personal accomplishment. This study demonstrated that higher levels of hardiness and spiritual well-being were related to lower levels of burnout. This affirms the importance of existential significance in nurses' work. Existential well-being provides explanations for life events and experiences with clients and the workplace. The commitment of involvement with people is also rooted in spiritual well-being. Implications of the study include the need to address the existential significance of nursing in nursing schools, workplaces and in continuing profession education. Nurse's own spiritual well-being must be acknowledged, developed and nurtured.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHardiness and Spiritual Well-Being: Moderators of Professional Nurse Burnouten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158224-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hardiness and Spiritual Well-Being: Moderators of Professional Nurse Burnout</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sims, Kathleen, MN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Linfield College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing, 2255 NW Northrup, Portland, OR, 97210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503.413.7170</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ksims@linfield.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">It is widely acknowledged that nursing is a stressful profession. Nurses are assuming more responsibilities and striving to maintain a high quality of care. There is also a looming nursing shortage. These influences and more may all contribute to nurse burnout. With burnout a loss of nurses from the profession can occur, quality of care can diminish and professional satisfaction can be curtailed. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of hardiness and spiritual well-being as moderators of burnout in professional nurses. Pines (1993) model of burnout was used as the conceptual framework. This model proposes that people have goals and expectations, which are brought to a work environment. If those goals and expectations are met then existential significance or meaning and purpose is achieved. Such meaning and purpose was once found primarily in religion but now more people look for such satisfaction in work. When people fail to achieve meaning and purpose in work, burnout is likely to occur. A descriptive correlation study of a random sample of 200 registered nurses living in a western state was conducted. Nurses completed measures of demographic data, hardiness, spiritual well-being and burnout. Results demonstrated that existential well-being, a component of spiritual well-being related positively with hardiness and its components of control, challenge, and commitment. Hardiness and spiritual well-being were negatively related to burnout expressions of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and positively related with personal accomplishment. Age, years of experience, spiritual well-being and hardiness explained 33% of the variance in emotional exhaustion and 21% of the variance in depersonalization and personal accomplishment. This study demonstrated that higher levels of hardiness and spiritual well-being were related to lower levels of burnout. This affirms the importance of existential significance in nurses' work. Existential well-being provides explanations for life events and experiences with clients and the workplace. The commitment of involvement with people is also rooted in spiritual well-being. Implications of the study include the need to address the existential significance of nursing in nursing schools, workplaces and in continuing profession education. Nurse's own spiritual well-being must be acknowledged, developed and nurtured.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:38:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:38:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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